Behavior | Veterinary Medicine

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Behavior

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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Jan 10, 2007
Dr. Wayne Hunthausen offers his recommendations for making the first puppy visit a smooth one.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Nov 01, 2006
Contrary to popular belief, cats are not asocial creatures.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Nov 01, 2006
To help aggressive cats and the families that own them, veterinarians must rule out medical problems, take a complete history, make a sound diagnosis, and provide sensible advice.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Oct 01, 2006
Veterinarians should encourage pet owners to turn to them for expert advice and assistance. Let clients know that you, not the pet store employee or the self-proclaimed master dog trainer, are the best source for reliable behavior recommendations.
Oct 01, 2006
By dvm360.com staff
You want your clients' relationships between their children and their pets to start off on the right foot and develop in a healthy direction. Here are some tips to help make sure the whole household gets along.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: May 01, 2006
The final column in this series on feline communication focuses on integrating all the signals we have discussed and in reviewing their roles given the context of the specific behavioral environment.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Mar 01, 2006
By dvm360.com staff
I always try to have dry kibble immediately available when examining a pet to reward its good behavior and, perhaps, to teach the animal a new behavior while the owner and I are talking.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Feb 01, 2006
The third column in this continuing series on feline communication will focus on overall body posturing and the behavioral information it provides. Because no signaling system can be removed from the context of the entire animal, using what we have learned from observation of behavioral cues from felines' faces and tails can be extremely useful when we look at the cat in its relevant social context.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Nov 01, 2005
The second column in this series on feline communication will focus on the information provided by cat tails. While no signaling system can be removed from the context of the entire animal and correctly interpreted, it can be very useful to look at what information can be communicated by each body part involved in signaling. Then, we can take these observations and look for congruence or lack of it between other signaling systems (e.g., the eyes, voice, body, etc.) The only system closed to our understanding, for now, is the olfactory.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Oct 01, 2005
Cat owners can have a lot of questions: "Should I get a second cat as a playmate?" "How can I stop my cat from scratching the furniture?" "Why doesn't he use the litter box?" So in the spirit of David Letterman, I compiled this top 10 list of cat behavior tips.