Proceedings - Cardiology - Veterinary Healthcare
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Proceedings - Cardiology
Source: CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS

ECG reading session—cardiac arrhythmias (Proceedings)

May 1, 2011

Arrhythmias can be classified based on ECG analysis based on the heart rate (normal, bradyarrhythmias, tachyarrhythmias); anatomic origin of the rhythm disturbance (SA, atrial, atrioventricular, or ventricular); or electrophysiologic mechanism when evident.

Source: CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS

Feline cardiovascular diseases: parts 1, 2, 3 (Proceedings)

May 1, 2011

Cardiovascular (CV) diseases in cats include congenital malformations, acquired heart, and vascular disorders. Myocardial disorders or cardiomyopathies, the major cause of heart failure, thromboembolism, and persistent arrhythmias in cats, constitute the focus of this presentation.

Source: CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS

Management of acquired canine heart disease: part 1 & 2 (Proceedings)

May 1, 2011

Acquired heart diseases of dogs include chronic degenerative valvular diseases (endocardiosis), pericardial diseases, cardiac neoplasia, dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC), pulmonary hypertension (PH), infective endocarditis, and heart rhythm disturbances, some of which represent primary electrical disorders and others that develop secondary to cardiac remodeling.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

New standards for treating heart failure (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Chronic heart failure (CHF) traditional therapy (for CHF secondary to chronic degenerative valvular disease etc.) still provides only an average a 4-6 months survival time in dogs. Though current standard treatment regimens provide a good quality of life for many canine patients, complications can lead to early patient loss.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Diagnostic cardiology in the exam room (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Determine age, breed, and sex of the patient to help formulate a rule-out list and help to determine prognosis. Note current pre-existing diseases. Record current drugs and clinical response. Record presenting clinical signs and duration and progression of the illness.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Simulated cardiology clinic-case studies (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

The patient suspected of having a cardiac problem needs to have a complete history taken and physical examination performed; these procedures will establish the correct diagnosis and permit appropriate therapy. The cardiac examination is an extension of the complete physical examination.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Diagnosing heart failure in 2010 (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

The clinical signs of canine and feline heart failure are limited, but they must be distinguished from pulmonary dysfunction and also systemic problems. Heart disease often results in secondary respiratory signs (e.g., coughing or dyspnea); conversely, disease of the lung or its vasculature can result in secondary right heart disease (e.g., cor pulmonale).

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Cardiac drug formulary for every practice (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Advancing technology has provided clinicians with ever more powerful and effective drugs for treating diseases. As more drugs become available, it becomes progressively more difficult to be aware of the numerous side effects, contraindications, and drug interactions of the many cardiopulmonary drugs available.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Practical use of the ECG in practice (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

The essentials of electrocardiography include the assessment of heart rate, heart rhythm, and the P-QRS-T waveforms. The ECG is needed to accurately diagnose cardiac arrhythmias, and this test is extremely sensitive for this purpose.

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