Proceedings - Feline Medicine - Veterinary Healthcare
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Proceedings - Feline Medicine
Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Endoscopy & cats—the places we can go (Proceedings)

August 1, 2011

Endoscopy is a wonderful diagnostic tool that allows exploration and biopsies of areas without invasive surgery. Given the option, many clients may prefer endoscopy instead of surgery. What types of cases are suited to endoscopy? How do you prepare a cat for endoscopy?

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Idiopathic cystitis (Proceedings)

August 1, 2011

Feline lower urinary tract diseases are characterized by hematuria, pollakiuria, and dysuria, and are common problems encountered in feline practice. It is estimated that they affect over one half million cats in the United States annually. Although there are numerous recognized causes of these signs, the exact cause is never identified in the majority of cases.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Medical management of FLUTD: What do we really know? (Proceedings)

August 1, 2011

FLUTD refers to a spectrum of diseases that result in pollakiuria, hematuria, stranguria, dysuria and/or periuria in the cat. Common causes of these clinical signs include urolithiasis, urethral plugs and neoplasia (most commonly, transitional cell carcinoma).

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Heartworms in cats: new insights (Proceedings)

August 1, 2011

A new study performed at Auburn University's College of Veterinary Medicine is radically changing our understanding of how heartworms affect the cat. In this study three groups of cats were studied for 8 and 16 months with antibody and antigen tests, radiographs of the heart and lungs, and necropsy examinations of the heart and lungs.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Chronic rhinitis (Proceedings)

August 1, 2011

Among the key frustrations is a lack of understanding about exactly what this condition represents (i.e. Is there really a causal relationship to some form of infection? is it immune-mediated? Allergic?...). Since it is a diagnosis of exclusion, there is also always a bit of doubt about whether or not I may have missed a primary nasal diseas.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Power hour—chronic vomiting in cats: it's really not hairballs (Proceedings)

August 1, 2011

Most chronic vomiting and chronic diarrhea in cats originate in the small bowel

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Inhalation therapy for respiratory diseases (Proceedings)

August 1, 2011

The use of inhaled medications is certainly not a new phenomenon in feline medicine. It makes intuitive sense that local delivery of medication might result in different actions than systemic administration. There are two primary methods for delivering inhaled medications to cats: 1) use of metered dose inhalers (MDI) or 2) use of a nebulizer to aerosolize liquid medications.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Fever of unknown origin: interesting feline cases (Proceedings)

August 1, 2011

Cats with fevers (103? F-106? F) are a common occurrence in everyday practice. Most cases respond to antibiotic therapy or are self-limiting (abscesses, viral infections, post-surgical fevers). However, the most frustrating case is one in which a routine course of antibiotics does not improve the clinical condition of the cat, routine diagnostics do not identify the cause and the fever is ongoing.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Renal insufficiency: definitely not renal failure (Proceedings)

August 1, 2011

The use of ACEi for renal disease is controversial because we do not have convincing data that they are either protective or detrimental to the kidneys.

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