Osteoarthritis center - Veterinary Healthcare
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Osteoarthritis center
Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Osteoarthritis in cats (Proceedings)

August 1, 2008

Two basic types of joint disease afflict people and animals: degenerative joint disease (osteoarthritis) and inflammatory joint disease (e.g., rheumatoid arthritis).

Source: CVC IN BALTIMORE PROCEEDINGS

Managing immune-mediated thrombocytopenia and immune-mediated arthritis (Proceedings)

April 1, 2008

There are a number of causes of decreased platelets in dogs and cats, but whenever platelet counts fall acutely an immune-mediated disorder should be suspected.

Source: CVC IN BALTIMORE PROCEEDINGS

Preventing osteoarthritis: What are the facts? (Proceedings)

April 1, 2008

Osteoarthritis affects diarthrodial joints of small animals including the shoulder, elbow, carpus, hip, stifle, tarsus, and spinal articulations.

Source: DVM360 MAGAZINE

Faux joints created for study of arthritis

December 1, 2007

Columbia, Mo. — University of Missouri researchers have developed an in vitro joint model that replaces laboratory animals, cuts costs and improves safety when studying human and canine arthritis.

Source: VETERINARY MEDICINE

That old, slow dog: Is it really arthritis?

March 1, 2007

Geriatric dogs are commonly referred to us for evaluation of what clients call slowing down. Often the tentative diagnosis before referral is arthritis (or is interpreted by the client as such), and the dog is receiving an NSAID.

Source: VETERINARY MEDICINE

Research Update: Effects of electrostimulated acupuncture in dogs with elbow arthritis

January 1, 2007

In this controlled clinical trial from a university hospital, nine dogs with chronic forelimb lameness and radiographic evidence of elbow osteoarthritis were treated with electrostimulated acupuncture.

Source: DVM360 MAGAZINE

Getting the jump on osteoarthritis

November 1, 2006

Columbia, MO — A group of researchers is exploring ways to diagnose and treat osteoarthritis in the earliest stages, before irreversible damage is done to joints.

Source: VETERINARY MEDICINE

Osteoarthritis in cats: Still a mass of unknowns

February 1, 2006

When addressing arthritis in cats, we presume similarities to arthritis in dogs, interpreting radiographs and clinical signs with canine differential diagnoses in mind. And we develop therapies based on how dogs are managed. But these presumptions have little scientific basis. In fact, we know little about how many cats have arthritis, what effect their arthritis has on their lifestyles, or to what degree therapy improves their comfort level.

Source: Clinical Edge

Weight loss increases ground reactive force in overweight dogs with osteoarthritis

October 1, 2004

A comprehensive weight-loss program that returns overweight dogs to optimal body weight and body condition can improve osteoarthritic dogs' ability to move more normally. In a study conducted at Texas A&M University, moderately overweight to obese dogs lost weight through a combination of a weight-management diet and increased exercise. Based on force-plate gait analysis, the dogs exerted significantly more force on each limb and moved more quickly. The abstract below, published in the proceedings of the 2000 Purina Nutrition Forum, provides additional details.

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