Proceedings - Clinical Pharmacology - Veterinary Healthcare
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Proceedings - Clinical Pharmacology
Source: CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS

Drug-drug interactions (Proceedings)

May 1, 2011

Clinically significant drug interactions are rarely reported in veterinary medicine, however the incidence is probably far greater than is reported. With the introduction of more and more veterinary drugs, as well as the use of more human drugs in animals, the incidence is likely to increase in the next few years.

Source: CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS

Therapeutic drug monitoring (Proceedings)

May 1, 2011

The success of any fixed dosing regimen most often is based on the patient's clinical response to the drug. Fixed dosing regimens are designed to generate plasma drug concentrations (PDC) within a therapeutic range, ie, achieve the desired effect while avoiding toxicity.

Source: CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS

Analgesics in practice: NSAIDS (Proceedings)

May 1, 2011

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been a mainstay of veterinary analgesia for many years. They are frequently used for the treatment of lameness, abdominal pain, inflammation, and fever. Current formulations are cheap, easy to use, and well absorbed.

Source: CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS

NSAIDS and cats: what do we know? (Proceedings)

May 1, 2011

The cat as a species represents a therapeutic challenge when trying to use NSAIDs safey, including the newer drugs. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs block the first step of prostaglandin synthesis by binding to and inhibiting cyclooxygenase This action is both dose and drug dependent.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

What's new in antiarrhythmic therapy (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Identification and correction of the underlying causes of arrhythmias are key to their long-term, successful management. For instance, in a cat with atrial standstill as a result of hyperkalemia from urethral obstruction, the arrhythmia is best addressed by correction of the underlying problem, hyperkalemia, as primary antiarrhythmic therapy is generally unsuccessful when such electrolyte abnormalities are present.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Antimicrobial resistance: are we there yet? (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

The ability of organisms to develop resistance to an antimicrobial varies with the species and strain. Many organisms remain predictably susceptible to selected drugs (eg, Brucella, Chlamydia); whereas others are becoming problematic (Pasteurella multocida).

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

NSAIDs: choices and issues (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

As their name implies, nonsteroidal aniti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are used in the treatment of inflammatory conditions, which are characterized by redness, swelling, heat, pain, and loss of function. Although the inflammatory response can be viewed as essentially protective and beneficial to the body, excessive inflammation in the face of progressive disease can promote the cycle of increasing damage and inflammation.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Anticonvulsant therapy: the new and the old (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Successful control of seizures with anticonvulsant drugs reflects a balance in achieving seizure control while minimizing undesirable drug side effects. Variability in the disposition of anticonvulsants and interactions among them and other drugs are important confounders of successful therapy.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Transdermal gel drug therapy: fuss or must? (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Individualized drug therapy increasingly is being recognized as an important aspect of health care for both human and veterinary medicine. However, the number of animal drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is sparse in comparison to those for human patients.

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