Proceedings - Critical Care - Veterinary Healthcare
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Proceedings - Critical Care
Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Practical critical care techniques (Proceedings)

August 1, 2011

Emergency and critical care medicine is one of the fastest growing fields within veterinary medicine. The standards and quality of care continue to rise and the pet owning community is expecting state of the art care for their pets.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Thoracic trauma (Proceedings)

August 1, 2011

Traumatic injuries of the respiratory system are fairly common in the dog and cat. Most of these injuries can lead to life threatening complications. It is important that the veterinary clinician be familiar with the clinical signs associated with these injuries and be prepared for aggressive intervention when required.

Source: CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS

Shock and resuscitation: Be a shock buster (Proceedings)

May 1, 2011

Small animals in crisis will present for a myriad of reasons: vomiting, diarrhea, bloat, urinary obstruction, dystocia, trauma...the list is endless. A rapid assessment must determine whether the animal has decompensated or is likely to decompensate. Decompensation will be directly related to Airway, Breathing and/or Circulatory failure.

Source: CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS

Neurological emergencies (Proceedings)

May 1, 2011

Neurological emergencies are common in small animal practice. As with other body systems, infections, neoplasms, trauma, inflammatory processes, congenital and hereditary diseases all affect the central and peripheral nervous systems causing a range of mild to severe conditions.

Source: CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS

Acute respiratory distress—what to do when they are so blue (Proceedings)

May 1, 2011

Acute respiratory distress (ARD) is the sudden onset of rapid and/or labored respiratory. It can be caused by pathology or obstruction associated with the nasal passages, oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, trachea, bronchi, alveoli, pulmonary vasculature or lymphatics, pulmonary innervation, chest wall, diaphragm, or pleural space.

Source: CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS

Practice pearls for common emergencies (Proceedings)

May 1, 2011

Successful, efficient, sterile placement of intravenous (IV) catheters should be mastered by all providing care of the emergent patient. It should be understood that placement of short, large-bore peripheral catheters provide the most rapid means for intravascular volume expansion.

Source: CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS

Blood gas interpretation (Proceedings)

May 1, 2011

Disturbances of acid-base equilibrium occur in a wide variety of critical illnesses and are among the most commonly encountered disorders in the intensive care unit (ICU). In addition to reflecting the seriousness of the underlying disease, disturbances in hydrogen ion concentration ([H+]) have important physiologic effects.

Source: CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS

Principles of trauma management (Proceedings)

May 1, 2011

The principles surrounding the initial approach to the patient with abdominal trauma are similar to those in a patient that has sustained any form of trauma. Rapid assessment of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems should be performed, and the presence of shock should be identified.

Source: CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS

Managing head trauma (Proceedings)

May 1, 2011

Primary injury is a direct result of the initial insult, is complete at the time of presentation and cannot be altered. Secondary brain injury is an alteration of brain tissue, either anatomical or physiological, which occurs after the primary injury, and can be prevented or ameliorated with optimal supportive care.

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