Osteoarthritis center - Veterinary Healthcare
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Osteoarthritis center
Source: Clinical Edge

Canine Osteoarthritis: Understanding the etiology, clinical presentation, and diagnosis

October 1, 2004

Osteoarthritis is the most common rheumatic disease encountered in small animal practice. No longer is osteoarthritis regarded as a simple consequence of aging and cartilage degeneration, but rather, the pathologic changes of osteoarthritis may result from active biochemical and biomechanical processes partly due to disturbances of the homeostatic mechanisms of anabolic and catabolic pathways. As to the cause of osteoarthritis, there is no one etiology and its cause may be multifactorial. While there are many initiating causes, osteoarthritis is an irreversible process that often results in an end-stage clinical syndrome of the joint.

Source: Clinical Edge

Osteoarthritis and its origins: Disease development at the cellular and molecular level

October 1, 2004

While osteoarthritis is perceived as a structural disease, the underlying pathology and chronic changes occur at a cellular and molecular level. In this article, we will discuss recent research involving the molecular mechanisms involved in osteoarthritis and newer opportunities for treatment. Key to this knowledge are research tools emerging from the scientific disciplines of functional genomics and molecular biology.

Source: Clinical Edge

The role of fatty acids in the management of osteoarthritis

October 1, 2004

Osteoarthritis is a chronic and potentially debilitating disease involving the disruption of metabolic homeostasis within the articular chondrocyte. Specifically, osteoarthritis involves an increased ratio of cartilage-degrading enzymes (matrix metalloproteinases, or MMPs) to their normal inhibitors, tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs). It is the imbalance of TIMPs and MMPs that contributes to the pathologic breakdown of cartilage. Dietary fatty acids can help to correct this imbalance by modulating the production of inflammatory mediators.

Source: Clinical Edge

A closer look at canine osteoarthritis

October 1, 2004

Osteoarthritis, or degenerative joint disease, is the most prevalent joint disorder in dogs. Mild osteoarthritis may cause subtle gait changes or intermittent lameness. As osteoarthritis severity progresses, the dog may become less active, show visible lameness, experience difficulty rising or lying down, express pain, or experience difficulty posturing to urinate or defecate.

Source: Clinical Edge

Osteoarthritis and diet: Joined at the hip

October 1, 2004

Osteoarthritis, also called degenerative joint disease, is the most prevalent joint disorder in dogs, affecting as many as 20% of adult dogs. Osteoarthritis is associated with inflammation and increased degradation or loss of proteoglycans from the extracellular matrix, resulting in a morphologic breakdown in articular cartilage.

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