Proceedings - Behavior - Veterinary Healthcare
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Proceedings - Behavior
Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Diagnosis canine aggression—why dogs bite the hand that feeds them (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

For many years, we taught clients who live with dogs who bite that the problem is likely 'dominance' – the dog is possessing over space, food or other resources to establish a hierarchical position. While some aggressive reactions may be due to the dog's perceived need to guard a resource, there is no evidence that interactions with humans aim at establishing rank.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Ethics, practice, tools and problems in behavioral control (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

A discussion of the ethics of behavioral treatment begins with some important topics. First, can you stick to the ethics of veterinary medicine and still be on firm footing with behavioral issues? Second, what does "do no harm" mean in the context of behavioral therapy? Third, how will you provide your clients with effective training and behavioral therapy?

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Abuse—handling and managing cases (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Even the best veterinarian will eventually face a client who is disappointed, angry or frustrated. In this session we will discuss examples that you bring to the table, such as 'Rocky', a ten year old male Springer Spaniel had bitten the clients' two year old daughter.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Evaluating behavior services (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

The first thing to appreciate about animal behavior services is the lack of specific credentials that assure competence. Currently there are at least three scientifically oriented groups attempting to set standards for the business of animal behavior modification and training.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Stopping lethal behaviors: life-saving client-keeping strategies (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Tens of millions of dogs and cats die from behavioral problems each year. The exact amount is unknown and perhaps unknowable, but tens of millions is a pretty good ballpark number. This number exceeds all deaths at veterinary clinics from all causes, by several times.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Treating canine aggression: How to make sure that they don't take the arm when offered a little finger (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Aggression to family members or persons who are familiar with the aggressive dog accounts for the majority of cases presented to veterinary behaviorists. Causes for this behavior vary greatly and may include competitive aggression, fear aggression, pain induced aggression or maternal aggression.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Gradual desensitization and counter conditioning: too little, too late (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

In the world of modern behavior therapy, there are two popular mainstays – gradual desensitization and counter conditioning. If a dog is terrified of thunderstorms, one plays back a sound recording of thunder at very low volume and "desensitizes" the dog to the thunder over a long period of time.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Overview of research in operant and respondent conditioning (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Our popular understanding of animal behavior rests in two major areas of study – ethology and behavior analysis. Ethologists study the way animals behave in a natural habitat. They study body language, posturing and assorted ways that animals influence each other and their environment.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Punish or perish: the bias that destroys millions of client animals (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

This year, millions of dogs will die because of the absence of proper care. Their numbers exceed all the animals treated in all the veterinary hospitals across the country. Their common failing is behavioral, not medical or nutritional. This behavioral train-wreck is composed of several innocuous but highly lethal behaviors: jumping on people, darting out the front door, destroying property, tugging on leash and biting.

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