Proceedings - Critical Care - Veterinary Healthcare
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Proceedings - Critical Care
Source: CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS

Hot topics from the 16th annual IVECC symposium (Proceedings)

May 1, 2011

The clinical utility of ultrasonography in the emergency room has been expanding in recent years. Two techniques recently presented are known as abdominal focused assessment with sonogram for trauma (AFAST) and thoracic focused assessment with sonogram for trauma (TFAST).

Source: CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS

Acute abdominal hemorrhage (Proceedings)

May 1, 2011

Abdominal hemorrhage can result from disruption of a "blood" organ such as the liver or spleen, damage or avulsion of an abdominal artery or vein, or coagulation defect. The presence of blood in the abdomen can result in acute and severe pain from the abdominal cavity, abdominal organs or the nerves, muscles, fascia or skin associated with the abdomen.

Source: CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS

Pediatric emergencies (Proceedings)

May 1, 2011

At birth, the autonomic nervous system and the baroreceptor reflexes are immature, with the ANS maturing by day 10 and the baroreceptor system maturing by 4 weeks. Due to this immature state, it is difficult for the neonate to respond to changes in blood pressure.

Source: CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS

Dealing with dystocia (Proceedings)

May 1, 2011

Many of the reproductive abnormalities that present as emergencies are straight-forward and relatively easy to resolve. Treatment of these diseases, however, requires knowledge of the underlying pathophysiology as well as the options available for dealing with such emergencies.

Source: CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS

When is vomiting or diarrhea an emergency? (Proceedings)

May 1, 2011

Vomiting is one of the most common medical presentations to the emergency room. It is not uncommon for the dog or cat to eat grass or their food and vomit – and subsequently go about their lives unaffected. So – when is vomiting an emergency? While there are no simple, nor clear cut answers, the simple guidelines in the box can guide the triage nurse or doctor.

Source: CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS

CPCR update: it may take your breath away (Proceedings)

May 1, 2011

The first published article on cardiopulmonary cerebral resuscitation (CPCR) was published over 50 years ago, entitled "Closed-Chest Cardiac Massage" and was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (Kouwenhoven, 1960). Despite this long history, even today CPCR is unsuccessful in the vast majority of attempts.

Source: CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS

Blood component transfusion therapy (Proceedings)

May 1, 2011

Blood component transfusion is generally provided as supportive therapy for correction of one or more hematologic and/or hemostatic deficiencies, until the underlying disease process can be controlled or corrected. Blood component administration and its immediate endpoints often are only one part of a general therapeutic plan.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Abdominal trauma: keys to success (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Abdominal trauma may result in specific injury of the peritoneal or retroperitoneal structures, diaphragm, or body wall constituents. Pain referred from other sites (especially spine) is also frequently mistaken for abdominal pain.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Management of dogs and cats with septic peritonitis (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

The dog or cat with septic peritonitis may display evidence of sepsis, severe sepsis, septic shock, and frequently, multiple organ dysfunction. Septic peritonitis is a rapidly progressive clinical syndrome with an array of underlying etiologies. Early recognition accompanied by rapid medical stabilization, early surgical intervention, and diligent postoperative care is crucial to optimize the likelihood of a positive outcome.

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