Proceedings - Dentistry - Veterinary Healthcare
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Proceedings - Dentistry
Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Practical small animal periodontology (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

The largest portion of our dentistry case load in everyday practice involves the treatment of periodontal disease. No other oral malady will present itself more commonly. At the same time proper evaluation of the stage of periodontal disease is determined with probing, visual examination and radiographically.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Managing stage III and IV periodontal disease (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

Correct management of periodontal patients in veterinary practice demands a thorough understanding of veterinary dental radiographic anatomy, periodontal probing and many times open evaluation and direct visualization of diseased areas. Stage III periodontal disease in particular requires advanced skills and familiarization with periodontal pathophysiology to make decisions to attempt to grow new supportive tissue adjacent to compromised teeth or extract them.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

A case approach to canine dental radiograph interpretation (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

Radiographic evaluation has fast become a common facet of veterinary dentistry and only practices that utilize dental radiography can practice quality dentistry. Interpretation of radiographic changes that occur in the tooth and surrounding bone take many forms.

Source: CVC IN BALTIMORE PROCEEDINGS

Surgical extraction and oronasal fistula repair (Proceedings)

April 1, 2010

While it is true that many patients with dental problems are geriatric, anesthesia is generally safe and predictable. Routine precautions should be taken with preoperative assessment, not to determine whether or not to administer anesthesia, but to determine how to do it safely.

Source: CVC IN BALTIMORE PROCEEDINGS

Dental radiography: Equipment and positioning (Proceedings)

April 1, 2010

A good clinical oral examination is one of the most important tools we have for diagnosing many dental and oral problems. However, much of the pathology in the oral cavity involves the roots and supportive bone of the teeth instead of their visible crowns.

Source: CVC IN BALTIMORE PROCEEDINGS

Mandibular fracture repair using acrylic external fixators (Proceedings)

April 1, 2010

Mandibular fracture is a relatively common injury. Surgical repair of the mandible is complicated by the presence of tooth roots and a mandibular canal with its neurovascular contents.

Source: CVC IN BALTIMORE PROCEEDINGS

Dental and oral examination: The normal oral cavity of dogs and cats (Proceedings)

April 1, 2010

Familiarity with the normal structures and physiology of the oral cavity is a powerful tool to help identify what is not normal. Detailed examination of many normal mouths is the best way to acquire expertise.

Source: CVC IN BALTIMORE PROCEEDINGS

Radiographic diagnosis of canine oral pathology (Proceedings)

April 1, 2010

Radiographs should be made whenever clinical examination indicates that there might be subgingival pathology that could be identified or better characterized by evaluating the hidden hard tissues.

Source: CVC IN BALTIMORE PROCEEDINGS

Feline tooth resorption and caudal stomatitis (Proceedings)

April 1, 2010

Some of the known causes of external root resorption include inflammation related to infection (either marginal from periodontal disease or apical from endodontic disease), pressure secondary to expanding cysts, tumors, or impacted teeth, excessive orthodontic force, after any trauma to the periodontal ligament, and one component of the normal process of primary tooth exfoliation.

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