Proceedings - Feline Medicine - Veterinary Healthcare
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Proceedings - Feline Medicine
Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Cholangiohepatitis (Proceedings)

August 1, 2011

Inflammatory disease has been reported to be the second most common category of liver disease in cats in the US (after hepatic lipidosis). However, within this category, there are a number of different pathologic patterns that may represent different stages of disease or even potentially separate disease conditions.

Source: CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS

Managing and preventing feline respiratory diseases (Proceedings)

May 1, 2011

Herpesvirus 1 (rhinotracheitis; FHV-1) and calicivirus (FCV) are the most common viral causes of sneezing and nasal discharge in the cat. If oral ulcers are present, calicivirus is most likely. If corneal ulcers are present, herpesvirus 1 is most likely. FHV-1 has now also been associated with chronic stomatitis, facial dermatitis, and endogenous uveitis. Viral rhinitis with or without secondary bacterial infection can be recurrent.

Source: CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS

Bronchopulmonary disease in cats—is it really asthma? (Proceedings)

May 1, 2011

Feline bronchial disease goes under a multitude of names reflecting the considerable heterogeneity in anatomic locations as well as etiologies that may be involved.

Source: CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS

Chronic renal disease in cats: treat 'em, don't kill 'em (Proceedings)

May 1, 2011

I much prefer creatinine over BUN.

Source: DVM360 MAGAZINE

How to identify inappropriate feline elimination

May 1, 2011

The most common concern expression by clients about their cats' behavior involves inappropriate elimination.

Source: CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS

Chronic vomiting and diarrhea in cats: it's really not hairballs or worms (Proceedings)

May 1, 2011

Most chronic vomiting and chronic diarrhea in cats originate in the small bowel.

Source: CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS

Feline pancreatitis: underdiagnosed or overdiagnosed? (Proceedings)

May 1, 2011

For years, feline pancreatitis has been assumed to be a similar disease to that in dogs. As with so many other disorders, this group of disorders is different in the cat.

Source: CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS

Calcium oxalate challenges in cats (Proceedings)

May 1, 2011

Most cats with kidney uroliths have no clinical signs.

Source: CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS

Managing and preventing feline febrile diseases (Proceedings)

May 1, 2011

The 2 major differentials for elevated body temperature (> 102.5 F) are fever (pyrexia) and hyperthermia. Hyperthermia results from increased muscle activity, increased environmental temperature, or increased metabolic rate (i.e. hyperthyroidism). Fever develops when the thermoregulatory set point in the hypothalamus is increased, resulting in increased body temperature from physiologic mechanisms inducing endogenous heat production or heat conservation.

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