Proceedings - Critical Care - Veterinary Healthcare
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Proceedings - Critical Care
Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Emergency and critical care applications of interventional radiology (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Following the trends in human medicine, there is an ongoing effort to adapt and develop minimally invasive therapeutics for the management of various problems facing veterinary patients. Minimally invasive therapeutics offer the advantages of smaller incisions, decreased pain, shortened anesthesia times and shorter length-of-stay compared to traditional open surgical approaches.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Thoracic trauma: keys to success (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Traumatized small animal patients represent a population in which a standardized approach to diagnosis centered on thorough background knowledge of traumatic injuries coupled with a complete physical examination will allow for rapid therapeutic interventions and optimization of patient care.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Aortic thromboembolism in cats (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Distal aortic thromboembolism (ATE) is most commonly recognized as a devastating sequel to underlying cardiac disease in the cat. The purpose of the following pages is to present the reader with a review of the veterinary literature as it pertains to pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis for cats with ATE as well as to provide some comparisons between different treatment and prophylactic measures.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Practical transfusion therapy (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

The transfusion of blood products to treat acute blood losses, coagulopathies, and severe anemia has become indispensable in the care of critically ill veterinary patients. As with any therapy, the risks, cost and potential benefits associated with the use of blood products must be carefully considered and every effort should be made to minimize the occurrence of adverse effects.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

CPCR 2010: techniques and updates (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

CPCR is the restoration of spontaneous circulation AND the preservation of neurologic function. CPCR techniques are constantly evolving through laboratory and clinical research. The most comprehensive review of currently accepted American Heart Association (AHA) Guidelines can be found in the 2005 AHA Guidelines for CPR and Emergency Cardiac Care.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

CPR: preparing for the ultimate emergency (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

In its earliest forms, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is most likely as old as human society itself. Depictions of mouth-to-mouth ventilation appear in ancient Egyptian hieroglyphics, and descriptions appear in the bible. Modern CPR techniques emerged in the late 1950's and early 1960's.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Tracheal collapse: old disease; newer treatment options (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Tracheal stent placement is a novel treatment option for dogs presenting with tracheal collapse refractory to traditional medical management and for those in which the nature and location of the collapse make them poor candidates for prosthetic ring placement.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Feline respiratory distress (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Cats with respiratory distress represent a significant diagnostic and therapeutic challenge to the small animal veterinarian. The most common causes of feline respiratory distress are pulmonary edema, pleural effusion, asthma, and neoplasia. Available methods to try to elucidate the etiology of an individual cat's respiratory distress include evaluation of historical and physical examination findings, thoracic radiography, cytology and ultrasonography or echocardiography.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

What you need to know about MRSA (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Beginning with Alexander Fleming's discovery of penicillin there has been an ever escalating arms race between microbes and the doctors that treat life-threatening infection. Fleming's discovery saved countless lives; however, it did not take long for bacteria to respond by developing mechanisms for resistance.

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