Proceedings - Anesthesia - Veterinary Healthcare
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Proceedings - Anesthesia
Source: CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS

Anesthesia for pregnancy or cesarean section and for neonates (Proceedings)

May 1, 2011

Anesthesia of the pregnant dog or cat falls into two categories, anesthesia of a pregnant animal for a procedure unrelated to the pregnancy and anesthesia of a pregnant animal specifically for a problem related to the pregnancy/cesarean section. Anesthesia of a pregnant animal for procedures unrelated to the pregnancy is often not problematic unless the animal is in a compromised state.

Source: CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS

Anesthesia for dogs and cats with endocrine disease (Proceedings)

May 1, 2011

The endocrine systems throughout the body play crucial rolls in the maintenance and metabolism that are required to maintain health. Perturbations in many of these symptoms occur in dogs and cats and veterinarians are often required to diagnose and treat these conditions that may last throughout the lifetime of a pet.

Source: CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS

Opioids: Why should poppies be so popular? (Proceedings)

May 1, 2011

Opioids are a group of natural derivatives or synthetic relatives of opium, which is extracted from the exudate of seedpods of the opium poppy, Papaver somniferum. The poppy plant appears to have been cultivated in ancient civilizations, like those of Persia, Egypt and Mesopotamia, and the first known written reference to the poppy appears in 4,000 BC (from 'A Brief History of Opium' at http://opiates.net).

Source: CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS

Analgesia drop by drop: constant rate infusions made easy (Proceedings)

May 1, 2011

Constant rate infusions (CRI) of analgesic drugs are an excellent way to manage pain in both dogs and cats.

Source: CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS

Expanding your use of local anesthetics (Proceedings)

May 1, 2011

Local anesthetics were once a mainstay of pain management in veterinary medicine, and may now be one of the most under-utilized modalities. Administered locally or regionally, they are the only modality that renders complete anesthesia to a site, i.e. no transmission of nociceptive impulses as long as the drug exerts its effect.

Source: CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS

Perioperative analgesia: surgery doesn't have to be a pain (Proceedings)

May 1, 2011

No matter what anesthetic protocol is chosen, the addition of adequate analgesia is imperative for safe anesthesia. Most anesthetic agents, including the anesthetic gases, block the brain's response to pain but don't actually block pain. If the pain is severe enough, the brain can still respond and make the animal appear to be inadequately anesthetized.

Source: CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS

Have you got the nerve? (Proceedings)

May 1, 2011

Local anesthetic drugs are extremely effective, inexpensive and easy to use. When local anesthetic drugs are administered, pain impulses originating in the periphery are blocked and prevented from reaching the central nervous system.

Source: CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS

Pain management for emergency & critical care patients (Proceedings)

May 1, 2011

Our patient population has changed fairly dramatically in the last 10 years as our medical skills have progressed and we have become capable of supporting patients with advanced disease and advancing age.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Anesthesia for patients with respiratory disease (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

The presence of disease has been shown to be positively associated with increased anesthesia-related mortality. Indeed, the possibility of rapid decompensation when sedative or anesthetic drugs are administered in the presence of respiratory disease makes anesthesia in these patients particularly challenging.

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