Proceedings - Clinical Pharmacology - Veterinary Healthcare
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Proceedings - Clinical Pharmacology
Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Opioid and tramadol use in outpatients: What are reasonable choices? (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

Nonsteroidal antiinflamatory drugs (NSAIDs) are commonly used in veterinary medicine for a variety of reasons including the management of acute postoperative pain and chronic pain associated with degenerative joint disease among other conditions. However adverse effects preclude their use in many patients and severe adverse effects such as nephrotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, and gastrointestinal ulceration and perforation, and death occur infrequently.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Bacterial culture and sensitivities, what do they really mean? (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

Treatment of bacterial infections can be difficult and frustrating. There are many different opinions for empiric antimicrobial therapy.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Newer drugs for the treatment of epilepsy (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

For many years, short and long-term therapy of epileptic disorders in dogs and cats has been based on the use of benzodiazepines (e.g. diazepam), barbiturates (e.g. phenobarbital) and bromide, either individually or with different combinations. While phenobarbital and bromide are still widely used for the long-term therapy of epilepsy in dogs and cats, newer agents have become available that can be used as adjunctive or sole therapy.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Top clinical pharmacology myths busted (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

Morphine cannot be used in cats due to CNS excitement and slow metabolism and morphine causes histamine release in dogs resulting in severe hypotension and the most common adverse effects of opioids are cardiovascular and respiratory depression.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

The all-natural drugs you may already be using (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

Many clients are requesting all natural and alternative treatment options as they are under the impression that they produce less adverse effects than pharmaceutical compounds. This is a common misconception as some of the most toxic compounds known are natural products such as botulinum toxin, ricin, cobra venom, and uranium, among many others.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Practical review of drug interactions (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

Polypharmacy is increasingly common in the prevention and treatment of diseases in animals. Drug-drug interactions represent one common event associated with multidrug therapy that may interfere with optimal clinical outcome.

Source: CVC IN BALTIMORE PROCEEDINGS

Neonatal and geriatric pharmacology (Proceedings)

April 1, 2010

The neonatal period is defined as from birth to 2-4 weeks of age for puppies and kittens, with the pediatric period defined as up to 12 weeks of age. Because of major changes in physiology during this period, drug disposition and response are likely to be varied.

Source: CVC IN BALTIMORE PROCEEDINGS

NSAIDS: COX-1 and COX-2: What's the difference? (Proceedings)

April 1, 2010

Inflammation and pain are very common clinical problems in veterinary medicine. Although highly efficacious, use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is not without risks, especially when used in geriatric or debilitated animals. Practitioners need a basic understanding of the action of these drugs in order to appreciate clinical differences between them.

Source: CVC IN BALTIMORE PROCEEDINGS

Drug interactions (focus on cytochrome P450) (Proceedings)

April 1, 2010

With the increase in concurrent use in small animal patients, drug interactions are becoming more and more likely. Polypharmacy can have a number of unintended side effects.

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