Proceedings - Critical Care - Veterinary Healthcare
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Proceedings - Critical Care
Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Respiratory emergencies: surgical intervention for respiratory distress (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

A number of respiratory emergencies may ultimately require surgical intervention, but the surgical techniques most likely to be indicated on an emergent basis are tube tracheostomy, tracheal resection/anastomosis, tube thoracostomy, and diaphragmatic hernia repair.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Respiratory emergencies: respiratory support (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

Support of respiratory function in critically ill patients is extremely important because inappropriate oxygenation and/or ventilation can quickly lead to an animal's demise. Also, respiratory infections, especially nosocomial infections, can be quite serious.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Platelet disorders (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

Platelets are essential for normal hemostasis and serve three main functions. They maintain vascular integrity by forming platelet plugs and promoting endothelial vasoconstriction in areas of disrupted endothelium.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Managing the acute abdomen (Part 3): postoperative management (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

Postoperative management of acute abdomen patients includes general supportive measures and monitoring commonly performed with critically ill patients, analgesic medication, nutritional support, and specific interventions based on the underlying cause of the acute abdomen and/or the surgical manipulations employed to treat the condition.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Respiratory emergencies: postoperative management of respiratory distress (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

Patients that have undergone emergency surgery to address respiratory distress are routinely supplemented with oxygen in the early recovery period and are monitored for oxygenation status using physical parameters (respiratory rate, respiratory character, and mucous membrane color), pulse oximetry (SpO2), and, when practical, arterial blood gases (PaO2).

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Nutritional options in the critically ill patient (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

Adequate nutrition is essential for the critically ill patient. Nutrients are necessary to provide substrates for normal cellular functions, protein synthesis, and daily metabolic processes. The critical patient is often in a hypercatabolic state, so early nutrition is essential to prevent glycogen depletion, immune dysfunction, and loss of body mass, and to provide substrates for wound healing.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Disorders of coagulation (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

The primary hemostatic system alone is not sufficient to provide hemostasis if a large vessel is injured, or if there is significant vascular wall injury. Fibrin needs to be generated in order to form a stable clot, and this occurs through secondary hemostasis, or the coagulation cascade.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Managing the acute abdomen (Part 1): evaluation, diagnosis, and decision making (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

Acute abdomen is the acute onset of abdominal pain that requires prompt diagnosis and immediate intervention to prevent patient deterioration. The decision to operate depends on efficient diagnostic evaluation, and the timing of the surgery should be based on what will maximize survival and minimize morbidity.

Source: CVC IN BALTIMORE PROCEEDINGS

Sepsis and the critical cat (Proceedings)

April 1, 2010

In the 1991 consensus conference, sepsis was defined as evidence of infection and the clinical picture of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Severe sepsis is sepsis with evidence of organ dysfunction and hypotension or hypoperfusion. Septic shock is severe sepsis with refractory hypotension.

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