Proceedings - Feline Medicine - Veterinary Healthcare
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Proceedings - Feline Medicine
Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Feline infectious diseases–a collection of interesting cases (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Infectious diseases can often be insidious in their clinical presentation. Case studies will be used to highlight some interesting infectious diseases that can affect the feline patient.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Update on feline asthma (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Feline bronchopulmonary disease (FBPD), often referred to as "feline asthma" actually encompasses a group of common, but poorly understood, airway diseases. It is estimated that bronchopulmonary disease affects 1% of the general cat population and > 5% of the Siamese breed. Cats of any age can be affected and there is no clear gender predisposition.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

What's new, what's old, and what works in diabetes mellitus (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Diabetes mellitus (DM) is one of the most common endocrinopathies seen in cats. DM arises from a variety of pathophysiological causes. Causes of DM in cats include islet-specific amyloid deposition, chronic pancreatitis, obesity, infection, other illness, drugs, etc.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Feline idiopathic hypercalcemia (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Calcium in circulation occurs in three forms: calcium bound to proteins (approximately 40%), calcium complexed to various anions such as citrate and phosphate (8%), and ionized calcium (iCa, approximately 52%. The latter is the biologically active form of calcium and clinically-relevant hypercalcemia only exists when the ionized fraction of calcium is elevated.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Lower respiratory disease in cats (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

If the cat is presented for labored breathing questions should be directed to assist in differentiating upper from lower respiratory disease as some owners perceive stertorous breathing in a cat with upper respiratory disease as a form of labored breathing. This could be misleading to a clinician.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Endoscopy & cats–the places we can go (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Endoscopy is a wonderful diagnostic tool that allows exploration and biopsies of areas without invasive surgery. Given the option, many clients may prefer endoscopy instead of surgery. What types of cases are suited to endoscopy? How do you prepare a cat for endoscopy?

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Fever of unknown origin: interesting feline cases (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Cats with fevers (103? F-106? F) are a common occurrence in everyday practice. Most cases respond to antibiotic therapy or are self-limiting (abscesses, viral infections, post-surgical fevers). However, the most frustrating case is one in which a routine course of antibiotics does not improve the clinical condition of the cat, routine diagnostics do not identify the cause and the fever is ongoing.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Assessment and care of the senior cat (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Whether you call these patients geriatric, or "mature", special considerations are required in evaluating, examining, hospitalizing, and generally caring for older felines. Veterinarians and owners must understand that OLD AGE IS NOT A DISEASE, IT IS A STAGE OF LIFE.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Feline viral skin diseases (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Feline herpesvirus1 infection is most noted for causing URI disease and oral ulceration. Latent, persistent infection will occur in about 30% of affected cats. Vaccines do not prevent feline herpesvirus infection nor carriage or intermittent shedding of the virus. Recrudescence of signs or new lesions may occur with stress or concurrent illness.

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