Proceedings - Anesthesia - Veterinary Healthcare
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Proceedings - Anesthesia
Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Anesthetic complications and emergencies and how to handle them (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

The most effective way to deal with anesthetic emergencies is to prevent them and appropriate 1) stabilization of the patient, 2) selection of type and dosage of anesthetic drugs, 3) preparation of anesthetic equipment, 4) pre-, post- and intra-operative support of the patient, and 4) physiologic monitoring, will make the anesthetic episode safer and will decrease the likelihood of anesthetic emergencies.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Incorporating constant rate infusions into your anesthetic protocol (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

Constant rate infusions (CRI) of analgesic drugs are an excellent way to manage pain in both dogs and cats. A CRI of analgesic agents has several advantages over multiple repeated injections for pain relief.

Source: CVC IN BALTIMORE PROCEEDINGS

End tidal CO2 and pulse oximetry - They save lives (Proceedings)

April 1, 2010

Pulse oximeters are relatively inexpensive and provide continuous information about pulse rate and hemoglobin saturation. Pulse oximetry has limitations that need to be understood by the anesthetist.

Source: CVC IN BALTIMORE PROCEEDINGS

Arterial blood gas analysis and interpretation in small-animal practice (Proceedings)

April 1, 2010

In the past blood gas analysis and interpretation was performed primarily at university and large referral hospitals. The main argument against not using blood gas analysis to guide case management in private practice was the cost of purchasing and maintaining a bench-top blood gas analyzer. With the availability of relatively inexpensive point of care units such as the i-STAT and IRMA, blood gas analysis and interpretation has become more common.

Source: CVC IN BALTIMORE PROCEEDINGS

Anesthetic risk management (Proceedings)

April 1, 2010

Anesthetic related mortality would appear to be an easily quantifiable statistic that could be used to measure the outcome of the profession's current anesthetic practices. However, to rely solely on death rate as the measure of the quality of anesthetic care provided is inadequate.

Source: CVC IN BALTIMORE PROCEEDINGS

Dexdomitor and adjunctive analgesic drugs (Proceedings)

April 1, 2010

Alpha 2 adrenergic agonists bind to alpha 2 receptors located in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord and brainstem, modulating the release of substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide and various other neurotransmitters involved in rostral transmission of nociceptive information.

Source: CVC IN BALTIMORE PROCEEDINGS

Local and regional anesthetic techniques (Proceedings)

April 1, 2010

Patients are typically sedated or anesthetized and placed in sternal or lateral recumbency. Next, the cranial edge of the wings of the ilia are palpated.

Source: CVC IN BALTIMORE PROCEEDINGS

Arterial blood pressure: Measurement and treatment options (Proceedings)

April 1, 2010

Patients vary and accidents occur. This truth emphasizes the need for patient monitoring. One only need visit the exhibit hall of a major veterinary meeting to appreciate the advancements made in veterinary patient monitoring.

Source: CVC IN BALTIMORE PROCEEDINGS

ECG: Anesthetist's guide to common abnormalities and treatment options (Proceedings)

April 1, 2010

The electrocardiogram is a useful monitoring tool, but its proper use requires training. It provides a heart rate and a picture of the electrical activity of the heart muscle. The anesthetist should be trained to recognize many commonly encountered intraoperative arrhythmias (e.g., multifocal and unifocal ventricular premature complexes, atrioventricular blockade, ventricular tachycardia, etc.) and the veterinarian should be prepared to treat arrhythmias when they occur (if necessary).

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