Proceedings - Feline Medicine - Veterinary Healthcare
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Proceedings - Feline Medicine
Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Practical information from ACVIM research: not yet in print (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is common in geriatric cats but often appears stable for long periods of time. Several studies have evaluated prognostic markers in cats with CKD, but few have identified which ones precede disease progression. The aim of this study was to find a marker which would predict deterioration of renal function in cats newly diagnosed with CKD.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Feline liver disease (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Hepatic lipidosis is the most common liver disease in cats in North America. In a retrospective study performed at the University of Minnesota evaluating liver biopsy specimens obtained from cats over a 10-year period, hepatic lipidosis accounted for 50% of all cases.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Do cats get bacterial urinary tract infections (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

The normal feline lower urinary tract has a number of defence mechanisms against infection. These include normal micturition (e.g., frequent and complete voiding), normal anatomy (e.g., length of urethra), uroepithelial mucosal barriers, the antimicrobial properties of normal urine (e.g., high specific gravity and osmolality) and a normal immune system.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Hypercalcemia in the cat: Not just idiopathic (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

Possible mechanisms of hypercalcemia.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Feline blood types: What you need to know and why (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

There are three well-known, clinically important blood groups in cats: A, B, and AB.1-2 Despite the nomenclature, the antigens in the feline AB blood group are not serologically related to the human ABO blood group antigens.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

The zen of cats: Maximizing the feline portion of your practice (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

The premise of this presentation is that feline medicine is good business. The keys to tapping into this market are several: understanding the significance of the feline market in your practice today and its future potential, understanding the psyche of the feline client and recognizing the different psychographic profile of cat vs. dog owners, using preventative medicine, specifically feline total parasite control, as a tool to practice better feline medicine, and, ultimately, realizing an increased feline average per client charge by practicing a higher quality feline medicine.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Managing calcium oxalate uroliths in cats (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

Struvite and calcium oxalate (CaOx) uroliths are the most commonly reported uroliths in cats. In the last 25 years, dramatic change in the prevalence of different urolith types has occurred. Until the mid-1980s, struvite uroliths made up 78% of submissions to the Minnesota Urolith Center (MUC).

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Feline obesity: Dietary therapy and beyond (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

It has been estimated that at 25 to 33% of cats are either overweight or grossly obese, with the highest rates seen in middle-aged cats. Yet the 2003 AAHA Compliance Study (The Path to High-Quality Care) found that veterinarians are significantly under diagnosing feline obesity. Owners also may not recognize when their cat is overweight, nor be aware of the associated health risks. Obesity should be the easiest disorder to diagnose, but it is also one of the hardest to treat.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Mycoplasmas in feline medicine (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

Mycoplasma species have been isolated in our laboratory from cats with URTD (Veir et al 2004) and have been detected at a higher rate in cats with URTD than normal cats by other authors (Bannasch and Foley 2005). However, they are readily detected in the oropharynx and nasal cavity of normal cats as well (Randolph et al 1993, Tan et al 1977).

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