Articles by Cynthia Trim, BVSc, MRCVS, DVA, DACV, DECVA - Veterinary Healthcare
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Articles by Cynthia Trim, BVSc, MRCVS, DVA, DACV, DECVA

Cynthia Trim, BVSc, MRCVS, DVA, DACV, DECVA


Articles
Nerve blocks improve general anesthesia (Proceedings)
April 1, 2008

Administration of analgesic agents into the epidural site has been documented to provide analgesia during anesthesia for surgery in dogs.

Anesthesia for thoracic surgery (Proceedings)
April 1, 2008

Goals of this presentation are to identify physiologic and pathologic abnormalities that require attention in order to provide safe anesthesia in dogs and cats that have, or will be undergoing, penetration of the thoracic cavity.

Recognize a complication: Prevent an anesthetic crisis (Proceedings)
April 1, 2008

Effective management of an anesthetic complication is dependent on early recognition of an abnormality and rapid implementation of a treatment plan.

Anesthesia for neurologic disease and procedures (Proceedings)
April 1, 2008

The primary concerns for anesthesia for dogs with spinal neurologic disease are the need to prevent pulmonary aspiration of gastric fluid if food has not been withheld, to maintain a low intracranial pressure (ICP) and therefore a low spinal cord pressure, and the provision for pain management.

Opioids: Bolus or CRI for anesthesia (Proceedings)
April 1, 2008

Many of the anesthetic agents commonly used today, including thiopental, propofol, isoflurane, and sevoflurane, have little intrinsic analgesic activity.

Anesthesia for sick patients (Proceedings)
April 1, 2008

Patients that have physiologic or pathologic abnormalities are more likely to develop complications during or after anesthesia and surgery.

Cardiopulmonary monitors: what to use and what does it mean? (Proceedings)
April 1, 2008

Monitoring the patient adequately is the basis of safe clinical anesthesia.

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