Articles by Lore Haug, DVM, DACVB - Veterinary Healthcare
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Articles by Lore Haug, DVM, DACVB

Lore Haug, DVM, DACVB


Articles
Behavior tips every practitioner should know (Proceedings)
May 1, 2011

Frustrated by that cat with chronic progressive renal disease that won't eat anything but its old diet? What about the cat that exhibits enduring anorexia after being ill even though you can't find any persisting medical reason? While there often are no simple answers for fixing these cases, there are simple ways to prevent your new kitten patients from developing into a future finicky eater.

Medically evaluating canine and feline behavior patients (Proceedings)
May 1, 2011

In some situations, practitioners are left trying to determine whether an animal's behavioral change reflects a medical issue or a behavioral problem. This distinction is fuzzy and frequently artificial. An individual's genetics, behavior and physiology are so intimately entwined with each other as to make them inseparable as discreet components.

Case studies in behavioral pharmacological therapy (Proceedings)
May 1, 2011

Our knowledge of the brain on the neurochemical, genetic and molecular level is increasing steadily each year. Despite this, little is definitively known about the neurochemical correlates of various disease processes. Much of our knowledge concerning the etiology of mental illness comes from response to pharmacological intervention.

Treat or euthanize: determining which patients can be helped (Proceedings)
May 1, 2011

Behavior problems are frustrating, emotionally taxing, and often dangerous to the animal or those around the animal. They can also pose a huge financial burden in terms of potential liability and resources for attempted resolution of the problem(s).

Establishing and maintaining relationships with qualified trainers (Proceedings)
May 1, 2011

Behavior questions and concerns are pervasive among veterinary clientele. Clients should always be offered the option of seeing a veterinary behaviorist; however, in many cases a veterinary behaviorist may not be locally available; the client may refuse such a referral; or the pet's problem may be amenable to simple alterations in the client's training process (or lack thereof!).

Feline inappropriate elimination (Proceedings)
May 1, 2011

Feline housesoiling still represents the most common reason cat owners seek behavioral advice from their veterinarian. Inappropriate elimination can be seen in all ages and breeds of cats and often can be frustrating to resolve. The causes are multiple and sometimes complex.

Why we should be teaching positive reinforcement (Proceedings)
May 1, 2011

For decades, dog behavior has been interpreted using a linear dominance hierarchy extrapolated from a wolf-pack model. This has led to the pervasive use of dominance constructs to incorrectly explain a variety of dog behavior problems. In particular, aggressive behavior has been erroneously equated with dominance.

Safe humane restraint (Proceedings)
August 1, 2009

Effective restraint is one of those aspects of veterinary medicine that we simultaneously take for granted but also wish we could do better.

Environmental enrichment for dogs and cats (Proceedings)
August 1, 2009

Environmental enrichment is an important and essential aspect of most animal management programs.

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