Articles by Michael D. Willard, DVM, MS, DACVIM - Veterinary Healthcare
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Articles by Michael D. Willard, DVM, MS, DACVIM

Michael D. Willard, DVM, MS, DACVIM


Department of Veterinary Small Animal Medicine and Surgery
College of Veterinary Medicine
Texas A&M University
College Station, TX 77843

Articles
Common esophageal diseases that are commonly missed (Proceedings)
May 1, 2011

Regurgitation occurs when there is either an anatomic obstruction or a physiologic weakness in the esophagus. In either case, food is retained in the esophagus and, if it passively migrates back into the oropharynx, can be regurgitated. The problem should be diagnosed quickly in an attempt to solve it before the esophagus becomes irreversibly-dilated or the patient experiences an aspiration pneumonia.

Managing cases of chronic small intestinal diarrhea (Proceedings)
May 1, 2011

Chronic diarrhea (i.e., that which persists > 2-3 weeks) usually necessitates a systematic diagnostic approach (which may mean classic tests and/or therapeutic trials). The first question in the patient with chronic diarrhea is whether the patient has an obvious problem such as parasites or an obviously inadequate or poor quality diet.

IBD is not the most common GI problem (Proceedings)
May 1, 2011

Once maldigestion is eliminated, then malabsorptive diseases must be considered. Malabsorptive small intestinal disease is a common cause of diarrhea. However, a substantial number of dogs (and cats) with malabsorptive small intestinal disease have normal stools despite severe intestinal pathology.

Protein-losing enteropathies – low albumin is not always bad (Proceedings)
May 1, 2011

When concerned with protein loss of any cause, one should measure serum albumin concentrations (NOT serum total protein concentrations). Do not use human clinical pathology laboratories as their technology typically does not detect canine albumin (meaning that they routinely report serum albumin concentrations of < 1.5 gm/dl in clinically normal dogs).

GI blood loss: ulcer, erosions, and stuff that mimics them (Proceedings)
May 1, 2011

Hematemesis necessitates a slightly different approach than we take with other vomiting cases because some rule-outs become more likely while others become much less likely. We will be including upper gastrointestinal bleeding of any cause in this discussion.

Portosystemic shunts: more common and more confusing than most realize (Proceedings)
May 1, 2011

Congenital portosystemic shunts (PSS) are much more common and certainly much more confusing than we ever imagined. At Texas A&M, we infrequently see the "classic" congenital PSS with the relatively straight forward presentation (i.e., young Yorkie with post prandial hepatic encephalopathy), probably because those cases are efficiently filtered out and never referred to us.

Other chronic intestinal diseases, especially infiltrative ones (Proceedings)
May 1, 2011

Intestinal biopsy may be accomplished two ways: endoscopy and surgery. CBC, serum chemistry profile, and urinalysis are useful and may point out systemic manifestations of the disease which will aid in correctly diagnosing and prognosing the problem (e.g., hypoalbuminemia due to histoplasmosis), but are also useful as a preanesthetic work up before endoscopy.

Iams Nutrition Insider for the Veterinary Team: The latest insights on inflammatory bowel disease (Sponsored by Iams)
July 1, 2010

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been an important topic of discussion and research in canine and feline gastroenterology for more than 20 years.

Iams Nutrition Insider: The latest insights on inflammatory bowel disease (Sponsored by Iams)
July 1, 2010

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been an important topic of discussion and research in canine and feline gastroenterology for more than 20 years.

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