Cardiology | Veterinary Medicine

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Cardiology

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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Nov 01, 2006
Pericardial effusion presents clinicians with a challenge when diagnosing the underlying cause, since the prognosis can be favorable in certain cases. Partial pericardectomy can be performed via thoracoscopy; and in select cases, this minimally invasive procedure can provide long-term relief of clinical signs.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Oct 01, 2006
Pimobendan, a benzimidazole-pyridazinone drug, is classified as an inodilator because of its nonsympathomimetic, nonglycoside positive inotropic (through myocardial calcium sensitization) and vasodilator properties.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Sep 12, 2006
By dvm360.com staff
GAINESVILLE, FLA. - 9/12/2006 - A University of Florida study aimed at discovering better ways to place pacemakers in dogs with complete heart block has received a $100,000 boost through a grant from the Morris Animal Foundation.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Aug 01, 2006
Dr. Bonnie K. Lefbom at the 2005 American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine Forum in Baltimore gave a lecture on sildenafil and novel cardiovascular therapies.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: May 01, 2006
Chronic valve disease (CVD), also called mitral valve disease or endocardiosis, is the most common form of acquired cardiac disease diagnosed in small- and medium-sized dogs. The mitral valve alone is affected in 60 percent of cases of chronic valve disease, whereas only the tricuspid valve is affected in 10 percent of cases. Thirty percent will have both the tricuspid and mitral valves affected. Endocardiosis is an age-related thickening of the mitral valve due to fibroblast proliferation and an increase in collagen and elastic fibers. The thickening of the mitral valve allows a regurgitant volume of blood to be forced from the high-pressure left ventricle into the low-pressure left atrium during systole. Over time, regurgitation can lead to progressive atrial and ventricular enlargement due to volume overload. Severe mitral regurgitation can lead to left-sided congestive heart failure and pulmonary edema formation. Long-term severe mitral regurgitation can lead to generalized heart failure. Right heart..
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: May 01, 2006
Fort Collins, Colo. — Dr. Janice Bright, a cardiologist at Colorado State University (CSU) is conducting ongoing research on feline arterial thromboembolism (ATE), using anti-platelet drugs called GP Iib/IIIa blocking agents.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Jan 01, 2006
We often underuse the auscultation and physical examination techniques our predecessors mastered to successfully evaluate the cardiovascular system. Instead, we lean on echocardiography to offset the subtle nuances we fail to recognize.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Jan 01, 2006
You can easily detect most arrhythmias on physical examination, but you'll need an electrocardiogram to identify an arrhythmia's exact nature.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Oct 01, 2005
Patients with congestive heart failure are, unfortunately, common in small-animal practice. Some patients present with acute exacerbation of previously diagnosed and treated cardiac disease. Other animals may present with vague and nonspecific clinical signs and have no known history of cardiac problems.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Oct 01, 2005
A Grade 1 murmur is the first audible sound you can hear. You can barely detect a Grade 1 murmur with your stethoscope.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Aug 01, 2005
Over thousands of years, greyhounds have been bred and selected for speed. This selective breeding may explain a number of the idiosyncrasies we see in the breed today. Retired racing greyhounds are becoming more common pets and more common patients in veterinary hospitals. It is estimated that about 18,000 greyhounds are placed into homes as pets annually. This article will familiarize practitioners with some idiosyncrasies in greyhounds that can affect their medical care.
May 01, 2005
We now have an arsenal of test kits and prophylactics to choose from, and it can be confusing to know which to purchase. We tend to mold ourselves to the product instead of molding the product to the individual patient. This article should help you tailor the heartworm diagnostic, therapeutic, and prophylactic options to each of your canine and feline patients.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Feb 01, 2005
FORT COLLINS, COLO.—A Colorado State University (CSU) cardiology team is headed to the University of London to perform open-heart surgery on a dog and help set up an open-heart surgery program at the Royal Veterinary College.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Feb 01, 2005
CCT aims to replace lost cardiomyocytes with progenitor cells capable of growing into new cardiac-like tissue.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Feb 01, 2005
By dvm360.com staff
How often have you said, "Look it up in Ettinger's?" Dr. Stephen J. Ettinger co-edited the renowned Textbook of Veterinary Internal Medicine, now in its sixth edition. An internist and cardiologist, he practices at California Animal Hospital in Los Angeles.