Dentistry | Veterinary Medicine

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Dentistry

Sep 01, 2006
There is no universally accepted definition of old age and as we are all aware, some people and animals age better than others. Because of advances in veterinary medicine, the average lifespan of cats and dogs has increased and according to recent AVMA statistics, about 30 percent of the owned pet population in the United States is considered geriatric (Wise et al, 2002). As senior care becomes a significant component of companion animal practice, we must be aware of the special anesthetic requirements of this population.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Aug 01, 2006
Elimination of pain is an effective focus and client motivator.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Jul 01, 2006
The idea of orthodontic correction for dogs frequently elicits snickers and causes uninformed eyes to roll.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Jun 01, 2006
Behind every flourishing dental practice is a great veterinary staff. If you want to move forward with your veterinary dental practice, it's time to get your technicians on board.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Mar 01, 2006
Prevention is one of the most important parts of hygiene, as teeth are clean for only about six hours.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Feb 01, 2006
Feline gingivostomatitis is probably the most frustrating oral disease seen in veterinary practice. Cats with this chronic, painful inflammatory disease can be severely compromised, and medical treatment can cause adverse effects.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Dec 01, 2005
A disturbing e-mail arrived the other day: Hello, Dr. Bellows: I have a 5-year-old yellow Labrador Retriever that I have routinely cleaned her teeth (with enzyme toothpaste and a brush, recently using Sonicare). Despite all best efforts, she is building up tartar and I think may have a dark spot (cavity on a rear molar).
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Jul 01, 2005
In May, I explained how to perform a nonsurgical extraction on single-rooted teeth including the incisors, first premolars, deciduous canines, and mandibular third molars. A surgical approach is indicated to extract canines, certain large incisors, and multirooted teeth and to retrieve root tips.
Jun 01, 2005
Proper professional dental prophylaxis is a must for every small animal practice. Prevention of periodontal disease can be accomplished only through regular professional care under general anesthesia. The following discussion details the essential steps in providing a thorough dental prophylaxis for our patients.
Jun 01, 2005
Intraoral radiographs are essential to perform quality dental therapy. Teeth can be cleaned and polished without seeing radiographic images below the gingiva, but "dentistry" cannot be performed properly.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: May 01, 2005
A dental extraction should be considered an end-stage procedure. When teeth are salvageable, we can go to great lengths to avoid extraction. Unfortunately, in many cases extraction is advisable and necessary.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: May 01, 2005
Frequently, dental cases present to animal hospitals for treatment of halitosis. Daily tooth brushing, although a noble idea, is rarely practiced. Clients rarely see their pet's teeth. They bring their dog or cat to the veterinarian to have the teeth cleaned and polished. Hopelessly effected teeth are extracted without the client ever seeing the true extent of disease or areas of special attention for home care. Thanks to digital photography and inexpensive software, bringing your client into his or her pet's mouth is now within every practitioner's reach.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Apr 01, 2005
By dvm360.com staff
Dr. Brad Rosonke, owner of Hillside Animal Hospital in Scottsdale, Ariz., has little interest in dentistry. But he knows that offering dental services means better care for his patients. His solution: Hire a dental resident--in his case, Dr. Peter Bates--to visit his practice on a regular basis. "This is a win-win-win situation," says Dr. Rosonke. "Dr. Bates needs to see more patients during his residency, I'm now free to see other patients while he's taking care of dental issues, and our clients get more complete care for their pets."
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Apr 01, 2005
By dvm360.com staff
To stop the bleeding associated with the extraction of deciduous teeth before surgery, place gauze over the empty socket and apply pressure by wrapping the mouth with Vetrap (3M).
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Feb 01, 2005
Tooth resorption is the most common dental problem in cats, with studies worldwide showing a prevalence rate (in cats presented for dental problems) of up to 75%.