Dentistry | Veterinary Medicine

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Dentistry

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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Jul 01, 2005
In May, I explained how to perform a nonsurgical extraction on single-rooted teeth including the incisors, first premolars, deciduous canines, and mandibular third molars. A surgical approach is indicated to extract canines, certain large incisors, and multirooted teeth and to retrieve root tips.
Jun 01, 2005
Proper professional dental prophylaxis is a must for every small animal practice. Prevention of periodontal disease can be accomplished only through regular professional care under general anesthesia. The following discussion details the essential steps in providing a thorough dental prophylaxis for our patients.
Jun 01, 2005
Intraoral radiographs are essential to perform quality dental therapy. Teeth can be cleaned and polished without seeing radiographic images below the gingiva, but "dentistry" cannot be performed properly.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: May 01, 2005
A dental extraction should be considered an end-stage procedure. When teeth are salvageable, we can go to great lengths to avoid extraction. Unfortunately, in many cases extraction is advisable and necessary.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: May 01, 2005
Frequently, dental cases present to animal hospitals for treatment of halitosis. Daily tooth brushing, although a noble idea, is rarely practiced. Clients rarely see their pet's teeth. They bring their dog or cat to the veterinarian to have the teeth cleaned and polished. Hopelessly effected teeth are extracted without the client ever seeing the true extent of disease or areas of special attention for home care. Thanks to digital photography and inexpensive software, bringing your client into his or her pet's mouth is now within every practitioner's reach.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Apr 01, 2005
By dvm360.com staff
Dr. Brad Rosonke, owner of Hillside Animal Hospital in Scottsdale, Ariz., has little interest in dentistry. But he knows that offering dental services means better care for his patients. His solution: Hire a dental resident--in his case, Dr. Peter Bates--to visit his practice on a regular basis. "This is a win-win-win situation," says Dr. Rosonke. "Dr. Bates needs to see more patients during his residency, I'm now free to see other patients while he's taking care of dental issues, and our clients get more complete care for their pets."
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Apr 01, 2005
By dvm360.com staff
To stop the bleeding associated with the extraction of deciduous teeth before surgery, place gauze over the empty socket and apply pressure by wrapping the mouth with Vetrap (3M).
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Feb 01, 2005
Tooth resorption is the most common dental problem in cats, with studies worldwide showing a prevalence rate (in cats presented for dental problems) of up to 75%.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Feb 01, 2005
As many of you are aware, February is national pet dental health month. In the past few years, many of us have ratcheted up our dental care skills, yet I often feel we still don't always do all the dental procedures our patients need.
Jan 01, 2005
As a small-animal practitioner, you spend a good portion of your day diagnosing and treating periodontal disease. Unfortunately, due to differences in salivary pH, our patients accumulate plaque and develop calculus five times faster than people. Research shows that 80% of dogs and 70% of cats show signs of gingival disease by the age of 3 according to the American Veterinary Dental Society. Periodontal disease can cause halitosis and pain and may be related to kidney and heart disease.
Jan 01, 2005
As a small-animal practitioner, you spend a good portion of your day diagnosing and treating periodontal disease. Unfortunately, due to differences in salivary pH, our patients accumulate plaque and develop calculus five times faster than people. Research shows that 80% of dogs and 70% of cats show signs of gingival disease by the age of 3 according to the American Veterinary Dental Society. Periodontal disease can cause halitosis and pain and may be related to kidney and heart disease.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Dec 01, 2004
Chronic ulcerative paradental stomatitis (CUPS) is a painful condition in dogs that is also known as ulcerative stomatitis, idiopathic stomatitis, and lymphocytic-plasmacytic stomatitis.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Oct 01, 2004
Most pets will benefit from a yearly dental cleaning and oral examination under anesthesia. When patients are discharged following a professional dental cleaning, a home-care program should be part of the take-home instruction sheet.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Sep 01, 2004
When you were in veterinary school, how many hours did you devote to studying dentistry?
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Sep 01, 2004
At least 10-percent bone loss must be present to notice periapical disease radiographically.