Dentistry | Veterinary Medicine

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Dentistry

Jan 01, 2005
As a small-animal practitioner, you spend a good portion of your day diagnosing and treating periodontal disease. Unfortunately, due to differences in salivary pH, our patients accumulate plaque and develop calculus five times faster than people. Research shows that 80% of dogs and 70% of cats show signs of gingival disease by the age of 3 according to the American Veterinary Dental Society. Periodontal disease can cause halitosis and pain and may be related to kidney and heart disease.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Dec 01, 2004
Chronic ulcerative paradental stomatitis (CUPS) is a painful condition in dogs that is also known as ulcerative stomatitis, idiopathic stomatitis, and lymphocytic-plasmacytic stomatitis.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Oct 01, 2004
Most pets will benefit from a yearly dental cleaning and oral examination under anesthesia. When patients are discharged following a professional dental cleaning, a home-care program should be part of the take-home instruction sheet.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Sep 01, 2004
When you were in veterinary school, how many hours did you devote to studying dentistry?
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Sep 01, 2004
At least 10-percent bone loss must be present to notice periapical disease radiographically.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Sep 01, 2004
Local anesthesia and regional anesthetic nerve blocks have been used for decades in human dentistry, but incorporating intraoral regional anesthetic blocks into veterinary dental and oral surgical procedures did not gain acceptance until the mid-1990s.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Aug 01, 2004
By dvm360.com staff
While performing dental exams, we found that holding the flews back with a spay hook helped.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Jul 01, 2004
Coming in September: Interpreting endodontic X-rays will be the subject of the next article in Dr. Bellows' radiography series.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Jun 01, 2004
Coming in August: Dr. Carmichael will complete his discussion on feline oral diseases including odontoclastic resorptive lesions, treatment options for fractured teeth, feline gingivitis/stomatitis syndrome and feline oral neoplasia.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Jun 01, 2004
Dentistry, including dental anesthesia, should be no less than 4.5 percent of each month's revenues.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: May 01, 2004
All small animal practitioners routinely take radiographs of patients where indicated. Radiographs simply put, help the veterinarian evaluate the patient.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Apr 01, 2004
By dvm360.com staff
A tip to protect fragile dental scaler tips.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Jan 01, 2004
Periodontal inflammation is the most common syndrome affecting small animals. In no other area of the body can the dedicated veterinarian and dental team make a lifelong difference in patient health and longevity.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Oct 01, 2003
When presented with a patient that has a fractured tooth, the practitioner is faced with options for care: do nothing, follow the patient with serial radiographs, place a crown on top of the fracture with or without performing root canal therapy, or extract the tooth. The decision is based on patient and client factors. This foundation article will discuss patient factors.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Aug 01, 2003
By dvm360.com staff
What is meant by the words overbite, open bite, overjet, level bite, overshot, underbite, anterior crossbite, wry bite, lingually displaced or base narrow canines?