Dermatology | Veterinary Medicine

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Dermatology

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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Oct 01, 2005
Many conditions can cause pruritus in dogs and cats, the most common being allergies (atopy, food, flea) and external parasites (e.g. Sarcoptes scabiei, Cheyletiella species).
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Oct 01, 2005
Most clients don't realize that dust mites are found in bedding, carpet, upholstery and mattresses — not in furnace ducts.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Sep 01, 2005
A 9-year-old castrated male Persian cat was referred with a four-month history of non-pruritic crusting and alopecia involving the face and abdomen.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Sep 01, 2005
By dvm360.com staff
When trying to diagnose demodectic mange, try plucking the hairs around lesions in addition to scraping the skin.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Aug 01, 2005
Fungi are commonplace in the environment and some are even considered normal inhabitants of the skin, gastrointestinal tract and other mucous membrane surfaces. In most situations, healthy birds can ward off infection if their immune systems are intact and fully operational. In other cases, however, the immune system may be compromised leading to the development of serious infections. Paramount to properly managing fungal infections in avian species is the ability to recognize infection early in the course of disease, to administer appropriate antifungal medications for the location and severity of infection, and to continually assess a patient's response to therapy. The scope of this article is to provide a brief overview of several fungal diseases in companion avian species.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Aug 01, 2005
By dvm360.com staff
MINNEAPOLIS- 8/1/05 - Five veterinarians won a trip to the George H. Muller Veterinary Dermatology Seminar in Hawaii this November for their written and photo submissions of dermatological cases in the practice setting.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Aug 01, 2005
Over thousands of years, greyhounds have been bred and selected for speed. This selective breeding may explain a number of the idiosyncrasies we see in the breed today. Retired racing greyhounds are becoming more common pets and more common patients in veterinary hospitals. It is estimated that about 18,000 greyhounds are placed into homes as pets annually. This article will familiarize practitioners with some idiosyncrasies in greyhounds that can affect their medical care.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Jul 01, 2005
Since a deep secondary pyoderma is usually present, a culture and sensitivity is usually performed.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Apr 01, 2005
Some cats with food-storage mite allergy present with facial excoriation and recurrent otitis.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Feb 01, 2005
A 2-year-old intact male Siamese cat was presented to the University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine's Dermatology Service for evaluation of self-mutilation and psychogenic licking of the forelimbs and abdomen.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Jan 01, 2005
Immunotherapy is still the therapy of choice for long-term treatment of atopy.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Jan 01, 2005
In a recent study, oral dextromethorphan hydrobromide was evaluated in 14 dogs with atopic dermatitis to determine whether the drug had any effect on repetitive behaviors associated with or suggestive of pruritus.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Dec 01, 2004
Ulcerative dermatosis of Shetland sheepdogs and rough collies is an inflammatory, erosive skin disorder of unknown etiology.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Nov 01, 2004
By dvm360.com staff
Instead of using regular acetate tape strips to collect samples to help diagnose Malassezia dermatitis, use packing tape.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Nov 01, 2004
A 9-month-old neutered male Labrador retriever was referred to the Small Animal Teaching Hospital of the University of Prince Edward Island for evaluation of a one-week history of pyrexia, a markedly swollen right tarsus, pronounced submandibular lymphadenopathy, and progressive pustular to erosive, nonpruritic, crusting skin lesions.