Dermatology | Veterinary Medicine

Dermatology

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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Jun 01, 2002
In DVM Best Practices on Feline Medicine (May, 2002), I wrote about feline ear mites and dermatophytes, two common infectious diseases often seen in feline practice.
May 01, 2002
Dr. Michele Rosenbaum outlines diagnostic and clinical management options for two of the most common infectious diseases seen in feline patients.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Apr 01, 2002
As mentioned in the first article (Feb. 2002) of this series, the presentation of the pruritic dog can be frustrating for the veterinarian because of the number of possible differential diagnoses.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Mar 01, 2002
By dvm360.com staff
When clients bring in their pets to have growths removed or wounds examined, we have the clients mark the problem spots on an anatomy chart. The chart makes it easy for us to locate all the lumps and lesions and is a great alternative to drawing on the animals with a marker. --Sage Olson, receptionist Kensington, Conn.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Feb 01, 2002
One of the most frustrating and time-consuming problems in everyday veterinary medicine is the presentation of the dog with pruritus.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Dec 01, 2001
I often get referrals of patients on immunotherapy that "aren't doing well" or hear from the owner that "those shots never helped so we stopped them."
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Sep 01, 2001

Malassezia (yeast) dermatitis can result in a primary skin problem or be present secondary to underlying disease. Because its presence can mimic (and complicate) other diseases such as atopy and food allergy, it is important to know how to recognize the organism, and of course, treat for it.

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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Sep 01, 2001
Malassezia (yeast) dermatitis can result in a primary skin problem or be present secondary to underlying disease.
Jun 01, 2001
By dvm360.com staff
Are you able to recognize certain skin disorders right off the bat? Take our quick quiz to see how you do.
Jun 01, 2001
Dr. Michele Rosenbaum examines the causes of focal, non-pruritic, non-inflammatory alopecia.
Jun 01, 2001
Dr. Alice Jeromin tackles diagnosing and managing genetic skin diseases such as sebaceous adentitis (SA) and canine familial dermatomyositis (DMS).
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: May 01, 2001
I love word derivations. For example, "hepato" means liver and "cutaneous" denotes skin. Quickly tying the two together, one is suspicious of a relationship between the two organs.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Mar 01, 2001
Although recognizing a bacterial pyoderma in a canine patient is relatively easy, eradicating the pyoderma can be difficult.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Jan 01, 2001
As we all know, dermatology is a very "visual" science. But what you see is only a part of what is actually occurring.