Dermatology | Veterinary Medicine

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Dermatology

Apr 01, 2003
At one time or another, we have all made the same mistakes when working up a dermatology case. To help us all save time and get the most information with the least amount of work, I thought I would address what in my referral practice appear to be the most commonly made mistakes when working up a dermatology patient.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Apr 01, 2003
Coming off of a long, dark winter as we are in the Midwest, we're confronted with a unique disease seen in certain breeds of dogs. Light responsive alopecia or seasonal flank alopecia is most often seen at this time of the year.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Apr 01, 2003
Editor's Note: In our ongoing telemedicine series, Dr. Johnny Hoskins presents medical case studies. The format is heavily focused on radiology and ultrasonography and details complicated, yet fairly common cases most veterinarians will be exposed to in practice.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Feb 01, 2003
"Why does my dog have dry skin? Didn't I wash off all the shampoo? Am I bathing him too much? Does he need a conditioner?" We have all been asked these questions many times. With the winter months upon us for those in the colder areas of the country, the low humidity often causes humans to have "dry skin". This may be true for our canine patients as well, however dry skin in dogs may be the result of several underlying diseases (Photo 1).
Sep 01, 2002
Dr. Alice Jeromin identifies skin conditions that can serve as early warning signs of internal disease. Using these clues practitioners can help prolong the lives of their patients.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Sep 01, 2002
Canine scabies is often missed (reportedly 70 percent of the time) and should always be considered.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Jul 01, 2002
All of us, at one time or another, were probably guilty of treating one of our sarcoptic mange patients as an allergic patient. It is the perfect example of a patient with the same clinical appearance and symptoms of two diseases: atopy vs. sarcoptic mange.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Jun 01, 2002
In DVM Best Practices on Feline Medicine (May, 2002), I wrote about feline ear mites and dermatophytes, two common infectious diseases often seen in feline practice.
May 01, 2002
Dr. Michele Rosenbaum outlines diagnostic and clinical management options for two of the most common infectious diseases seen in feline patients.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Apr 01, 2002
As mentioned in the first article (Feb. 2002) of this series, the presentation of the pruritic dog can be frustrating for the veterinarian because of the number of possible differential diagnoses.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Mar 01, 2002
By dvm360.com staff
When clients bring in their pets to have growths removed or wounds examined, we have the clients mark the problem spots on an anatomy chart. The chart makes it easy for us to locate all the lumps and lesions and is a great alternative to drawing on the animals with a marker. --Sage Olson, receptionist Kensington, Conn.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Feb 01, 2002
One of the most frustrating and time-consuming problems in everyday veterinary medicine is the presentation of the dog with pruritus.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Dec 01, 2001
I often get referrals of patients on immunotherapy that "aren't doing well" or hear from the owner that "those shots never helped so we stopped them."
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Sep 01, 2001

Malassezia (yeast) dermatitis can result in a primary skin problem or be present secondary to underlying disease. Because its presence can mimic (and complicate) other diseases such as atopy and food allergy, it is important to know how to recognize the organism, and of course, treat for it.

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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Sep 01, 2001
Malassezia (yeast) dermatitis can result in a primary skin problem or be present secondary to underlying disease.