Diagnostic procedures | Veterinary Medicine

Diagnostic procedures

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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Sep 01, 2003
Recently a colleague asked us for advice about how to prevent recurrence of a urolith that contained a nucleus of 100 percent calcium oxalate (CaOx) and a distinct outer layer of 95 percent magnesium ammonium phosphate (MAP) and 5 percent calcium phosphate (Image 1 and Figure 2, p. 12S).
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Aug 01, 2003
By dvm360.com staff
The radiograph was discovered more than 100 years ago. It has been a stalwart of diagnostic imaging in veterinary medicine. We have grown accustomed to its use. We use it to "rule out" numerous diseases. Unfortunately, we have known that it takes a marked change in the electronic density of the material to be seen radiographically. Some estimates indicate that in bone, radiographic density must change by 30-50 percent (either increase or decrease) in order to be visible on a standard radiograph. Therefore, numerous diseases can be present and escape the detection limit of a radiographic change. We must remember
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Jul 01, 2003
Signalment: Canine, Greyhound, 2.5 years old, female spayed, 65 lbs. Clinical history: The dog has a persistent urinary tract problem ? hematuria for at least one year according to the owner. The dog improves with antibiotics, but once finished, hematuria starts again. Therapy has included Clavamox.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Jun 01, 2003
Recently a colleague asked me if I could direct her to a reference source for normal and abnormal drinking and urine volumes of cats and dogs. Although this information is available, it is scattered in different textbooks and journal articles. The primary objective of this Diagnote is to provide this information in one concise location.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Jun 01, 2003
Signalment: Canine, Golden Retriever, 4 months old, female, 28 pounds. Clinical history: The puppy presents for vaccinations and has a potbelly.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: May 01, 2003
Recently a colleague in private practice asked me for advice about how to treat xanthine bladder stones formed by an 11-month-old, spayed female domestic shorthaired cat.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: May 01, 2003
Signalment. Canine, Bernese Mountain dog, 9 years old, female spayed, 70 lbs.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Apr 01, 2003
Editor's Note: In our ongoing telemedicine series, Dr. Johnny Hoskins presents medical case studies. The format is heavily focused on radiology and ultrasonography and details complicated, yet fairly common cases most veterinarians will be exposed to in practice.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Mar 01, 2003
Signalment: Canine, Golden Retriever, 7 years old, male, castrated, 72.2 lbs. The dog presents for progressive worsening PU/PD and generalized weakness for four to five weeks. The dog is showing anorexia and vomiting thick yellow bile since last evening. The dog has collapsing episodes in the rear legs. Therapy has included NPO for two days, intravenous fluids and metoclopramide.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Feb 01, 2003
Recently a colleague in private practice asked me for advice about how to treat cystine bladder stones formed by a 5.5 year-old, spayed female Siamese cat. Although textbooks that he consulted contained information about cystine urolithiasis in dogs, he was unable to find recommendations for this disorder in cats. How would you manage this case?
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Feb 01, 2003
"Why does my dog have dry skin? Didn't I wash off all the shampoo? Am I bathing him too much? Does he need a conditioner?" We have all been asked these questions many times. With the winter months upon us for those in the colder areas of the country, the low humidity often causes humans to have "dry skin". This may be true for our canine patients as well, however dry skin in dogs may be the result of several underlying diseases (Photo 1).
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Feb 01, 2003
Go beyond asking questions to find definitive answers
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Jan 01, 2003
Normal urinary continence. Micturition may be defined as function of the lower urinary tract that encompasses both a storage phase and a voiding phase. During the storage phase of micturition, the urinary bladder, acting as a low-pressure reservoir, is relaxed and fills with urine.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Jan 01, 2003
Signalment. Feline, domestic shorthair, 13 years old, female spayed, 13 lbs. Clinical history. The owner presents the cat for recent hair loss on its back.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Dec 01, 2002
Recently, a colleague in private practice asked my opinion about the likely benefit of obtaining an ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle biopsy of the kidney of an azotemic, isosthenuric, 8-year old domestic shorthair cat. She indicated that evaluation of a serum chemistry profile, hemogram and urinalysis revealed findings consistent with idiopathic chronic renal failure.