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Food Animal Medicine
Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Case studies: Heifer development and reproductive failure (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

Because one goal of proper heifer development is to improve second parity pregnancy percentage, a beef producer may ask "what is the impact of higher pregnancy percentages during the second breeding season on costs and income?" Table 1 displays the effect of changing pregnancy percentage for first-calf heifers in 5-percentage point increments on the percent of the herd that must be replaced each year and the average age of the herd. In general, given the assumptions in the table, for every 5-percentage point improvement in first-calf heifer pregnancy percentage, the number of replacements needed for the herd decreases by about 1 percentage point and average cow age increases by .01 years.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

What difference do antimicrobials make? (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

Antimicrobial efficacy in cattle can be evaluated through clinical studies including a negative control group. To be included here, the study must have specified that the subjects were randomized, the evaluators were masked to treatment, and that statistical analysis was applied. Much of the data were compiled from Food and Drug Administration Freedom of Information (FOI) summaries for veterinary drug approvals.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Drug regulations for the bovine practitioner (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

The Food and Drug Administration Center for Veterinary Medicine (FDA CVM) approves drug labels. The Environmental Protection Agency approves pesticides and products used on premises.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Susceptibility testing in veterinary medicine: what you can and can't conclude from S, I, and R (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

"Susceptible" and "Resistant" are thrown around in the fields of microbiology, medicine, public health, and epidemiology with great frequency. Unfortunately, these classifications are often used in a manner inconsistent with their correct application.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Control of trichomoniasis: Control at the state and farm levels (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

Trichomoniasis, or "trich," is a disease that can cause devastating reductions in the percentage of cows exposed to a bull that successfully calve. The disease is caused by a protozoan parasite, Tritrichomonas foetus and the organism is transmitted by the act of mating.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Economic considerations for disease testing strategies (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

Many veterinarians express frustration when trying to provide their clients with the best advice on which diagnostic tests to recommend for purchased cattle or the resident herd. The goal is to screen apparently healthy cattle to identify carriers of infectious disease that could cause reproductive losses and other health problems in the herd.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Sick cattle management (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

This morning we're going to talk about our least favorite topic – sick cattle. Sick cattle are not fun to deal with, but we’re always going to have some of them. I want you to understand that our philosophy should be to invest time at strategic points of the production cycle to reduce time spent at hospitals.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Targeting antimicrobials in food animals (part 1) (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

This checklist serves as a starting point for evaluating your applications of antimicrobials in food animals.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Heifer development—reproduction and nutrition (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

Replacement heifer development is a critically important area for veterinarians to offer production medicine advice to their beef-producing clients. In order for replacement heifers to calve at approximately 24 months of age and to reach puberty the equivalent of three heat cycles before the start of the mature cow breeding season, heifers must become puberal by 11 to 13 months of age.

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