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Food Animal Medicine
Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Susceptibility testing in veterinary medicine: what you can and can't conclude from S, I, and R (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

"Susceptible" and "Resistant" are thrown around in the fields of microbiology, medicine, public health, and epidemiology with great frequency. Unfortunately, these classifications are often used in a manner inconsistent with their correct application.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Drug regulations for the bovine practitioner (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

The Food and Drug Administration Center for Veterinary Medicine (FDA CVM) approves drug labels. The Environmental Protection Agency approves pesticides and products used on premises.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

What difference do antimicrobials make? (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

Antimicrobial efficacy in cattle can be evaluated through clinical studies including a negative control group. To be included here, the study must have specified that the subjects were randomized, the evaluators were masked to treatment, and that statistical analysis was applied. Much of the data were compiled from Food and Drug Administration Freedom of Information (FOI) summaries for veterinary drug approvals.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Case studies: Heifer development and reproductive failure (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

Because one goal of proper heifer development is to improve second parity pregnancy percentage, a beef producer may ask "what is the impact of higher pregnancy percentages during the second breeding season on costs and income?" Table 1 displays the effect of changing pregnancy percentage for first-calf heifers in 5-percentage point increments on the percent of the herd that must be replaced each year and the average age of the herd. In general, given the assumptions in the table, for every 5-percentage point improvement in first-calf heifer pregnancy percentage, the number of replacements needed for the herd decreases by about 1 percentage point and average cow age increases by .01 years.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Anti-inflammatories and analgesics for cattle (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

Drugs approved in the U.S. specifically for analgesia in cattle do not exist. There are guidance documents from the FDA Center for Veterinary Medicine for companies that would like to have an NSAID approved for pain relief

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Low-stress cattle handling: An overlooked dimension of management (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

For those of us who are tolerating bawling calves for four or five days in a row, tolerating buller rates of over a half a percent, please listen and see if some of these things might be helpful.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Selection and evaluation of beef heifers (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

Productivity for beef cattle herds has been shown to be increased when a high percentage of heifers become pregnant early in the first breeding season. A producer's heifer selection and development program should result in most heifers in the replacement pool reaching puberty at least 42 days prior to the start of breeding because the conception success to first service is lower on the puberal estrus compared to the third estrus.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Targeting antimicrobials in food animals (part 2) (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

These proceedings present data related to the question of how long to wait after administering a single injection antimicrobial before applying success/failure criteria. More accurately, we will evaluate success/failure and mortality data based on administering a uniform regimen and then waiting different periods before applying success/failure criteria, and the animal subsequently being eligible for further therapy.

Source: DVM360 MAGAZINE

FDA wants to 'phase out' use of antimicrobials for growth promotion in cattle

June 29, 2010

Rockville, Md. -- The Food and Drug Administration proposes to phase out antibiotic use in food animals unless there is a medical necessity.

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