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Special Report: Population movement signals new threats

May 1, 2008

The weather always can be counted on to influence parasite populations around the country, but it plays a lesser role these days compared to what humans are doing environmentally to affect the number and spread of disease vectors, entomology experts say.

Source: DVM InFocus

Fleas: They are happiest at home

May 1, 2008

The adult cat flea (Ctenocephalides felis) is a ubiquitous, enterprising and persevering insect. The cat flea is the most dominant, competitive and most common flea associated with domesticated animals today.

Source: DVM InFocus

Dentistry: Take a Closer Look

September 1, 2006

Dentistry: Take a Closer Look

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Non-invasive symphyseal fracture management offers excellent alternative to traditional approaches

September 1, 2006

Symphyseal fracture repair in cats has been performed traditionally by placing a ligature wire circumferentially around the anterior mandible and securing the right and left mandibular bodies by tightening the ligature wire. This method is not only invasive, but often results in an unstable symphyseal reduction because of the faculty of ligature wire to stretch over time.

Source: DVM InFocus

Navigating clinical oral anatomy imperative to successful oral care

September 1, 2006

Practical knowledge of veterinary dental anatomy and physiology is essential to the veterinarian and veterinary technician involved in providing quality oral care to their patients. Quality surgical skills are only attainable with a thorough understanding of these concepts.

Source: DVM InFocus

Intraoral films: 7 compelling reasons for every dental patient

September 1, 2006

According to industry estimates, less than 10 percent of small animal practices have dental radiograph units and of those, less than 10 percent take intraoral films on every dental case.

Source: DVM InFocus

Veterinary orthodontics: Some cases require braces

September 1, 2006

The primary objective of veterinary orthodontics is to provide a comfortable bite for companion animals. Cosmetics are often improved, however orthodontic care is never provided for deceptive purposes. Our ethical priority is to provide genetic counseling to avoid future problems associated with malocclusions. Traumatic malocclusions are painful for pets and painfully expensive for owners.

Source: DVM InFocus

Age remains pertinent to anesthetic management

September 1, 2006

There is no universally accepted definition of old age and as we are all aware, some people and animals age better than others. Because of advances in veterinary medicine, the average lifespan of cats and dogs has increased and according to recent AVMA statistics, about 30 percent of the owned pet population in the United States is considered geriatric (Wise et al, 2002). As senior care becomes a significant component of companion animal practice, we must be aware of the special anesthetic requirements of this population.

Source: DVM InFocus

When to refer?

June 1, 2005

There are multiple reasons to consider referring a patient to a veterinary dental specialist. Factors to consider when deciding on when to recommend a referral include the patient's problem, the primary veterinarian's level of expertise, available equipment, and the individual client and their expectations regarding patient care.

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