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DVM Best Practices
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New oral healthcare products

January 1, 2005

As a small-animal practitioner, you spend a good portion of your day diagnosing and treating periodontal disease. Unfortunately, due to differences in salivary pH, our patients accumulate plaque and develop calculus five times faster than people. Research shows that 80% of dogs and 70% of cats show signs of gingival disease by the age of 3 according to the American Veterinary Dental Society. Periodontal disease can cause halitosis and pain and may be related to kidney and heart disease.

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Intracorporeal suturing in minimally invasive surgery

November 1, 2004

Minimally invasive surgery is a rapidly developing discipline in veterinary medicine, thanks to its widespread use in human medicine. During the past 20 years, veterinarians have watched a temporally similar development with arthroscopic surgery. While minimally invasive surgery has many advantages over traditional open surgery—including reduced postoperative pain, reduced recovery times, and improved operative results—there is a caveat: It requires specialized training and considerable experience. In this article, I'll focus on one particular minimally invasive technique—intracorporeal suturing.

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Minimally invasive thoracic surgery

November 1, 2004

Imagine exploring the thoracic cavity and performing surgical interventions without using an intercostal or a median sternotomy.

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Surgical Stapling in Abdominal Surgery

November 1, 2004

Surgical stapling equipment allows the small-animal surgeon to perform a variety of challenging abdominal surgical procedures more quickly and consistently than with conventional, hand-suturing techniques. This article will summarize the use of these devices.

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Sutures: Past, Present, and Future

November 1, 2004

We live in a time when polymer chemists work magic with different suture materials to give them specific properties that benefit surgeons. Today's sutures absorb within a consistent time frame every time veterinarians use them, possess specific handling characteristics, demonstrate good knot security, and cause minimal tissue inflammation.

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Healthier patients are an annual visit away

June 1, 2004

My annual visit compliance has skyrocketed to 94% within 18 months of sending out reminder cards.

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Expert recommendations on feline parasite control

June 1, 2004

The CAPC guidelines are based on the concept that awareness of heartworms and other parasites can increase compliant use of broad-spectrum agents.

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Educating clients about their cats' healthcare

June 1, 2004

Alex Martin was raised in a dog-friendly home. As a child, he shared a bedroom with his brother and a 60-lb Labrador retriever. Most of his family photos include various dogs the family owned over the years, but no cats are in the portraits. "Cats hung around the house, but were never considered part of the family," Martin says.

Source: DVM Best Practices

Increasing the feline half of your practice

June 1, 2004

Treating just one species is challenging enough, but veterinarians in general practice must care for dogs and cats every day of the week, and many of these general practitioners consider the following two facts incontrovertible:

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