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Surgery STAT
Source: DVM360 MAGAZINE

Surgery STAT: Tracheal collapse: rings or stents?

August 1, 2008

Editor's note: SurgerySTAT is a collaborative column between the American College of Veterinary Surgeons (ACVS) and DVM Newsmagazine. In September, Shawn Mattson, DVM, DVSc, BSc will discuss "Treating Subchondral Bone Cysts in the Fetlock Joint." Dr. Mattson is an ACVS board-certified surgeon who practices at Moore and Company Veterinary Services, a full-service equine hospital in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Dr. Mattson, previously at the Ontario Veterinary College in Guelph, Ontario, has published scientific articles in the American Journal of Veterinary Research and Veterinary Surgery related to research on orthopedic infections in horses.

Source: DVM360 MAGAZINE

Surgery STAT: Don't forget the Miller's knot

July 1, 2008

Ligating the ovarian pedicles during an ovariohysterectomy in a large or obese dog can be a challenging task, especially if the ovarian pedicles are thick or surrounded by excessive adipose tissue that is not easily incorporated into simple encircling ligatures.

Source: DVM360 MAGAZINE

ACVS Surgery STAT: Tips for reducing the pain of amputations in dogs

June 1, 2008

Amputation is a painful procedure, so aggressive, multimodal analgesia is necessary. The patient should receive a premedication that includes a pure mu agonist opioid such as morphine, fentanyl, oxymorphone or hydromorphone.

Source: DVM360 MAGAZINE

Surgery STAT: Using active drains in wound management

May 1, 2008

The use of active drains enhances the efficiency and minimizes the morbidity of wound drainage. Their use is indicated for removal of pre-existing fluid, ablation of dead space and prevention of anticipated fluid accumulation.

Source: DVM360 MAGAZINE

Surgery STAT: CPSS surgery and aftercare

April 1, 2008

Congenital portosystemic shunts usually are single vessels that develop inside or outside the liver (Photo 1). Because these vessels carry blood around the liver instead of through it, the normal hepatic processes of metabolism, storage and production are disrupted. Most animals with congenital portosystemic shunts (CPSS) present with mild to moderate clinical signs that are not life-threatening. The most critical component for their long-term treatment is restriction of dietary protein to reduce substrates for ammonia formation by colonic bacteria. Diets for dogs with CPSS should be 15 percent to 20 percent protein on a dry-matter basis, readily digestible, high in zinc and vitamin E, and low in manganese. Sources of gastrointestinal hemorrhage (gastritis, parasites), which provide additional protein substrate, should be treated. Ammonia production and absorption can be reduced by administration of lactulose, antibiotics such as neomycin or metronidazole, or unflavored yogurt with active cultures. Cystitis..

Source: DVM360 MAGAZINE

Surgery STAT: Congenital portosystemic shunts

March 1, 2008

Congenital portosystemic shunts usually are single vessels that develop inside or outside the liver (Photo 1). Because these vessels carry blood around the liver instead of through it, the normal hepatic processes of metabolism, storage and production are disrupted.

Source: DVM360 MAGAZINE

Surgery STAT

February 1, 2008

Congenital portosystemic shunts (PSS) occur in 0.18 percent of all dogs, and are particularly common in Yorkshire Terriers, Maltese dogs, Pugs, Schnauzers and Shih Tzus.

Source: DVM360 MAGAZINE

Surgery STAT: Gastrojejunostomy tubes improve nutrition

January 1, 2008

EDITORS NOTE: A new collaborative column with the American College of Veterinary Surgeons (ACVS) and DVM Newsmagazine debuts this month. SurgerySTAT offers DVM readers insightful information for preoperative preparation, a surgical technique or postoperative care.

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