Food Animal Medicine - DVM
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Food Animal Medicine
Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Small ruminant parasite control (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

The most common reason for anemia in the small ruminant is internal parasitism. Hemonchus contortus (the barber pole worm) is a voracious bloodsucker that typically resides in the abomasum. The condition may occur in both young stock and adults alike. With the ever increasing issue of parasite resistance, practitioners will be faced with the severely anemic small ruminant. Providing that there are no other serious disease conditions, these cases can have successful outcomes.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Consumer perception and public policy on drugs used in cattle (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

At the time of this writing, the focus on farm animals by the media (and likely therefore consumer perception) seems to be on antimicrobial use in animal agriculture and on farm animal welfare.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Anti-inflammatories and analgesics for cattle (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Drugs approved in the U.S. specifically for analgesia in cattle do not exist.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Drug regulations for the bovine practitioner (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

The Food and Drug Administration Center for Veterinary Medicine (FDA CVM) approves drug labels. The Environmental Protection Agency approves pesticides and products used on premises. State Boards of Pharmacy regulate the practice of pharmacy and drug dispensing. State Boards of Veterinary Medicine regulate the practice of medicine.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Rarer neurologic diseases of food animals (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

BSE is defined as a slow developing neurodegenerative disease of cattle that begins insidiously with subtle signs progressing to terminal recumbency. This is a cerebral disease thus signs are consistent with abnormal mentation. Slight changes in behavior include increased apprehension and tactile and auditory hyperesthesia.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Case study: monensin (Rumensin) toxicity in dairy replacement heifers (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Many dairy producers use Rumensin? (Elanco Animal Health) in dairy heifers as an aid to controlling coccidiosis and for improved feed efficiency. Rumensin? also is approved for use in lactating cows as a tool for improving milk production efficiency. Monensin, the active compound in Rumensin?, has a very wide safety margin for humans and cattle. But, it can be toxic if not fed according to the FDA-approved label. In other species, such as horses, monensin can be extremely toxic.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

How to evaluate drug information (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

One can usually find many sources of information about drugs: FDA website, drug company websites and technical reports, VIN, journals, trade magazines, and so on. The important skill required of veterinarians is to assess that information to determine its usefulness in your daily practice. Below are some principles of evaluating drug information, with the goal of improving treatment and the practice of medicine.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

How drugs work (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

The science of how drugs work on the body (or the microorganism or parasite) is pharmacodymanics (its counterpart being pharmacokinetics, how the body works on the drug). In this section, the basic concepts of drug concentration and drug action are followed by a review of the mechanisms of action of the major drug groups used in food animal practice including NSAIDs, glucocorticoids, reproductive drugs, antimicrobials, and parasiticides.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Sick cria management: the Tennessee method (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Dealing with a sick cria and an anxious client can be quite daunting at times. This task becomes less daunting when one understands the main problems and how to manage them. Neonatal crias are typically admitted to the UT College of veterinary medicine due to prematurity/weakness/inability to stand, suspected or real failure of passive transfer (FPT), and septicemia.

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