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Food Animal Medicine
Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Environmental role in the epidemiology, transmission and diagnosis of Johne's disease (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP), the causative agent of Johne's Disease (JD), is prevalent worldwide. The NAHMS Dairy 1996 study, estimated 21.6% of the dairy herds in the US were infected with MAP, resulting in annual economic losses for the dairy industry of $200-250 million.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Common neurological diseases in food animal (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Maybe this doesn't really fit "common" but it is always interesting to hear about cases. The main thing about rabies in cattle (and other species) is that signs are quite variable and inconsistent. Certain signs should be "red flags" for bovine rabies. Oftentimes cattle with rabies will have some history of hindlimb ataxia, weakness, or paralysis (this in itself is typical of many bovine diseases but for cattle exhibiting these signs, rabies should be considered).

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Role of bovine viral diarrhea virus in feedlots (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is one of the most important infectious agents of cattle. The annual economic loss caused by BVDV is difficult to quantify but certainly is significant. The insidious nature of BVDV combined with the biology of the virus and complex disease pathogenesis has made control and prevention of this virus challenging.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Integrated BVD control plans for beef operations (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

More than 60 years ago an enteric disease of cattle was described in North America that was characterized by outbreaks of diarrhea and erosive lesions of the digestive tract.17 The disease was called bovine viral diarrhea virus or BVD. The virus causing BVD was named bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV).

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Antimicrobial therapy: regimen selection (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Traditionally, we have assumed that if a bacterial pathogen is "susceptible" to an antimicrobial, we just use the dose on the bottle or in a formulary, and the infection will be eliminated. The increasing incidence of "resistant" pathogens, i.e., pathogens requiring high concentrations of antimicrobials such that they become untreatable, has focused attention on identifying ways to reduce the selection for resistant organisms.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Beyond fertility to udder health, fresh pen, foot health (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

We have talked about supervision and finding treatment failures and conditions that have low odds of successful treatment in an efficient manner that is cost efficient for the dairy, good welfare for the cow and work we'd like to do. These are hollow words unless it can be delivered to the cows in need on a timely basis.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Control of trichomoniasis: Control at the state and farm levels (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

Trichomoniasis, or "trich," is a disease that can cause devastating reductions in the percentage of cows exposed to a bull that successfully calve. The disease is caused by a protozoan parasite, Tritrichomonas foetus and the organism is transmitted by the act of mating.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Accountability of dairy welfare, judicious use of drugs, and dairy management (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

Opponents of food animal use rhetoric and disturbing images to incriminate lack of welfare, criticize drug usage, and incriminate modern care practices if they weren't the same method of care as in the past. They have an audience of consumers that have little or no knowledge of food animal care.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Biosecurity to control reproductive disease in beef cattle (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

Pathogens differ in their virulence, contagiousness, and their modes of transmission. These differences exist not only between pathogens, but for virulence and contagiousness, can also differ between strains of the same species of pathogen.

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