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Food Animal Medicine
Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Ancillary therapy of respiratory disease in food animals: What can we give in addition to an antibiotic? (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

In this session we will take an evidence-based medicine approach to ancillary therapy of bovine respiratory disease. The literature reviewed here is not presented as being all-inclusive, but rather as a summary of many commonly cited articles on these subjects. The citations are primarily peer reviewed, but some are from freedom of information (FOI) summaries and a few are proceedings papers or abstracts.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

How to evaluate drug information (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

One can usually find many sources of information about drugs: FDA website, drug company websites and technical reports, VIN, journals, trade magazines, and so on. The important skill required of veterinarians is to assess that information to determine its usefulness in your daily practice.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Antimicrobial therapy: regimen selection (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

Recently, the use of antimicrobials in food animals has been scrutinized by the general public, by federal legislators, and by public health organizations. Some of these concerns relate to the use of antimicrobials as growth promotants, while some relate to the use of antimicrobials in food animals in general.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Heifer development—reproduction and nutrition (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

Replacement heifer development is a critically important area for veterinarians to offer production medicine advice to their beef-producing clients. In order for replacement heifers to calve at approximately 24 months of age and to reach puberty the equivalent of three heat cycles before the start of the mature cow breeding season, heifers must become puberal by 11 to 13 months of age.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Targeting antimicrobials in food animals (part 1) (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

This checklist serves as a starting point for evaluating your applications of antimicrobials in food animals.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Resistance challenges in veterinary medicine: Who's to blame for "superbugs" and how do we deal with them (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

This presentation attempts to summarize some of the major concerns in resistance development along with key articles explaining relevance, epidemiology, and prevalence. It is not intended to be an exhaustive review of the literature and the interested practitioner should use the cited literature herein as a basis for continued, extended reading.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Feedlot lameness prevention (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

Incidence of feedlot lameness varies by feedlot from .03% to 2.3% of cattle inventory on a health data base that includes 5,540,000 cattle in feedlots that vary in capacity from 5000 to 80,000 head. The average lameness incidence is .51%.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Antimicrobial therapy: interpreting susceptibility results (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

The design of antimicrobial regimens is addressed in the next section in these proceedings, but the concepts within regimen design related to determining the concentration of drug required to inhibit growth of bacterial pathogens deserve a more thorough discussion.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Records, records, records (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

Everything we have discussed to this point is actually about establishing a records plan that will allow us to serve the dairy industry of the future using the records that are efficiently gathered so we are not spending all of our time keeping or organizing the records. As our herds get larger, as the number of animals examined at any one time increases, as we are examining groups of diverse animals at one time, and as we struggle to maintain a cow side presence, the organization of the records becomes more critical.

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