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Food Animal Medicine
Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Economic considerations for disease testing strategies (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

Many veterinarians express frustration when trying to provide their clients with the best advice on which diagnostic tests to recommend for purchased cattle or the resident herd. The goal is to screen apparently healthy cattle to identify carriers of infectious disease that could cause reproductive losses and other health problems in the herd.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Sick cattle management (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

This morning we're going to talk about our least favorite topic – sick cattle. Sick cattle are not fun to deal with, but we’re always going to have some of them. I want you to understand that our philosophy should be to invest time at strategic points of the production cycle to reduce time spent at hospitals.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Consumer perceptions (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

The agricultural community is an extremely small percent of the general population and much of that population lives in densely populated areas of the country. They draw their perceptions of food animal care from their experiences and perceptions about zoos, their own companion animals, and the visual stories presented electronically from opponents of the animal industry.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Update on managing pain in food animals (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

The capacity to experience pain is considered to have a protective role by eliciting behavioral responses aimed at reducing further tissue damage and enhance wound healing. However, persistent pain syndromes offer no biological advantage and are associated with suffering and distress.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Consumer perceptions and public policy on drugs used in cattle (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

At the time of this writing, the focus on farm animals by the media (and likely therefore consumer perception) seems to be on antimicrobial use in animal agriculture and on farm animal welfare.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Antimicrobials for bovine respiratory disease (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

Bovine respiratory disease complex includes bacterial components, which cause the classic clinical signs of lethargy, depression, and fever, with variable nasal discharge, cough, or other signs. This bacterial component of BRD (most commonly Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, Histophilus somni, and Mycoplasma bovis) may be treated with antimicrobial drugs designed to kill or inhibit the growth of the pathogenic bacteria.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

How do drugs move through the animal (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

In most cases, we administer drugs at a different site than we want to drug to act. Understanding how drugs get to their site of action and how long they stay there is essential to making therapeutic decisions about which drug, what route, how much, how often, and for how long.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

Economic cost of BVD (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

Suckling calves are commonly in contact with the breeding herd during early gestation, prior to the time the bovine fetus develops a competent immune system. As a result, PI suckling calves are considered to be the primary source of BVDV infection in breeding herds causing pregnancy loss, pre-weaning mortality and the induction of PI calves in the next generation.

Source: CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS

How do drugs work (Proceedings)

August 1, 2010

The science of how drugs work on the body (or the microorganism or parasite) is pharmacodymanics (its counterpart being pharmacokinetics, how the body works on the drug). In this section, the basic concepts of drug concentration and drug action are followed by a review of the mechanisms of action of the major drug groups used in food animal practice including NSAIDs, glucocorticoids, reproductive drugs, antimicrobials, and parasiticides.

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