Articles by Karen M. Tobias, DVM, MS, DACVS - DVM
  • SEARCH:
News Center
DVM Featuring Information from:

ADVERTISEMENT

Karen M. Tobias, DVM, MS, DACVS


Articles
Surgery STAT: Managing methicillin-resistant wound infections
January 1, 2010

In dogs, Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (formerly recognized as S. intermedius) is the most common resident organism of the skin and the most common cause of canine pyoderma.

Surgery STAT: CPSS surgery and aftercare
April 1, 2008

Congenital portosystemic shunts usually are single vessels that develop inside or outside the liver (Photo 1). Because these vessels carry blood around the liver instead of through it, the normal hepatic processes of metabolism, storage and production are disrupted. Most animals with congenital portosystemic shunts (CPSS) present with mild to moderate clinical signs that are not life-threatening. The most critical component for their long-term treatment is restriction of dietary protein to reduce substrates for ammonia formation by colonic bacteria. Diets for dogs with CPSS should be 15 percent to 20 percent protein on a dry-matter basis, readily digestible, high in zinc and vitamin E, and low in manganese. Sources of gastrointestinal hemorrhage (gastritis, parasites), which provide additional protein substrate, should be treated. Ammonia production and absorption can be reduced by administration of lactulose, antibiotics such as neomycin or metronidazole, or unflavored yogurt with active cultures. Cystitis..

Surgery STAT: Congenital portosystemic shunts
March 1, 2008

Congenital portosystemic shunts usually are single vessels that develop inside or outside the liver (Photo 1). Because these vessels carry blood around the liver instead of through it, the normal hepatic processes of metabolism, storage and production are disrupted.

Surgery STAT
February 1, 2008

Congenital portosystemic shunts (PSS) occur in 0.18 percent of all dogs, and are particularly common in Yorkshire Terriers, Maltese dogs, Pugs, Schnauzers and Shih Tzus.

ADVERTISEMENT

Click here