Communication tools for the veterinary team - Firstline
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Communication Strategies
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Brush up on dental care

November 1, 2006

You know the routine all too well: Mr. Smith visits with his rambunctious English springer spaniel, Burt, and all goes well until you mention Burt's oral health. Enter the blank stare. Or the anxious shifting from foot to foot. Or even the hasty, "Oh, he's fine!"

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3 quick lessons for your team

November 1, 2006

Consider the following situations in practice. How would you handle each one?

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Give feedback that makes sense

August 1, 2006

When you say apple, do others hear orange? Use these tips to give helpful feedback that others will understand and appreciate.

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Direct your fee conversations

August 1, 2006

The way you talk to clients about what you charge and why can help your practice provide good care— or block your progress. Do you need to rethink your role?

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It's OK to say no

August 1, 2006

You like people and you like animals. This phrase was probably on your job application, and it's what you tell people when they ask you why you chose to work at a veterinary practice. But is it true? Oh, I know you like pets, but what about people?

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What's in it for me?

June 1, 2006

If you were going to spend $100 on a new set of tires, wouldn't you want to know why? Were the old ones worn out, or do the new ones work better in snow? Knowing why you should care makes it easier to make the decision to spend. And the same is true for clients and their pets. Clients expect a recommendation each time they visit your hospital, and they want to know how your recommendations benefit them and their pets. Once they know why they should care, they're more likely to comply.

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Serve up easy estimates

April 1, 2006

Discussing money with clients can be downright scary. Learning to present an estimate with poise takes the fear out of this critical task?and improves the odds that clients will say yes to your treatment plan.

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Keep your cool when clients complain

February 1, 2006

Use these tips to stay cool as a cucumber when clients get hot under the collar.

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Make sure you're heard

February 1, 2006

No one likes to feel ignored. So if your great ideas are flowing in one of your boss's ears and streaming right out the other, use these solutions to get yourself heard.

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