Practice tips for the veterinary team - Firstline
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Pearls of Practice
Source: FIRSTLINE

Paging Dr. X

October 1, 2005

Dr. X is running behind–again. But you don't want to interrupt him in front of the client. Here's an easy solution: Get him a pager. Shelly Hiemer, CVT, a technician at AMVET in Otsego, Minn., says her doctor chose to carry one so staff members could notify him when problems arise without interrupting. Then they developed a message system to indicate the degree of emergency. For example, if the team pages the doctor with number 33, he has 10 minutes to wrap up and get to the next client. Number 66 means he only has five minutes, and 99 means it's an emergency.

Source: FIRSTLINE

Get personal with clients

October 1, 2005

Gary Morgan, a receptionist for Robert E. Lewis, a dentist in Overland Park, Kan., has a special talent: He remembers the name of most of the clients who walk through the door. And with more than 1,500 client records in the practice database, that's no small feat.

Source: FIRSTLINE

Hook price shoppers

October 1, 2005

Don't let that next phone call be the client who got away. Use these tips from Sally Hickey, a receptionist at Short Pump Animal Hospital in Richmond, Va.

Source: FIRSTLINE

On the job: Sheila Lewis, CVT

October 1, 2005

Getting to know Sheila Lewis, CVT

Source: FIRSTLINE

Client education: a team project

October 1, 2005

In 23 percent of practices, credentialed technicians are responsible for most of the client's education, according to a recent survey by VetMedTeam.com. In 52 percent of practices, veterinarians handle the bulk of education, while in 19 percent of practices, veterinary assistants take charge of this task. Here's a look at the percentage of respondents who say team members discuss these issues with clients:

Source: FIRSTLINE

Streamline surgery releases

October 1, 2005

End-of-the-day surgery releases can bring chaos and confusion to even the most organized veterinary teams. That's why team members at Rock Road Animal Hospital in St. Louis, Mo., developed a system to route clients through the checkout process before they're reunited with their pets.

Source: FIRSTLINE

Celebrate a special technician

October 1, 2005

Drs. Mark Shackelford and Lou Ann Wolfe have a few things in common: They both work at practices on the same street in Tulsa, Okla., and they both have a team member who shines. For Dr. Shackelford, that person is Kimberly Seigrist, RVT.

Source: FIRSTLINE

Score points with the right pass

August 1, 2005

Gina Toman, a Firstline Editorial Advisory Board member and a veterinary assistant at Seaside Animal Care in Calabash, N.C., says that when you do a good job passing the client off to the receptionist after the appointment, you help prevent missed charges and improve the client's experience.

Source: FIRSTLINE

On the job

August 1, 2005

On the Job: Pam Weakly, practice manager at Dickman Road Veterinary Clinic in Battle Creek, Mich.

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