Educating pet owners about veterinary care - Firstline
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Client Education
Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Managing inflammatory bowel disease in cats (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is defined as gastrointestinal signs (vomiting, anorexia, diarrhea) greater than 3 weeks duration, with incomplete response to dietary trials and anthelmintics, biopsy findings of mucosal inflammation, and clinical response to immunomodulatory therapies.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

The science behind dental products (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Oral disease is one of the most prevalent diseases in dogs and cats. 80% of adult dogs and 70% of adult cats have some form of oral disease. Dental problems are among the top three pet owners concerns in dogs and cats. Calculus and gingivitis are the most common conditions diagnosed by veterinarians in all ages of animals.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Getting ready for the eye patient (and earn a raise) (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Anatomic and physiologic considerations are the basis for proper diagnostic techniques. We will discuss basic diagnostic procedures and relative pharmacological consideration to enhance the ophthalmic examination.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Veterinary ophthalmology for the technician (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Veterinary ophthalmology.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

The acute abdomen (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Acute abdominal pain is often associated with a variety of disorders in small animals. Abdominal pain can be the result of many different underlying diseases processes, many of which can be life threatening. Clinical signs can range from abdominal distension, prayer-type postures, vomiting and diarrhea, to more serious findings such as collapse, hypovolemic shock, hypothermia, and difficulty breathing. Acute abdominal pain thus requires rapid and efficient diagnostic evaluation with proper treatment to facilitate patient survival.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Respiratory/ventilatory monitoring (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Capnographs are used to measure ETCO2. Most capnographs use infrared light absorption to measure CO2 levels. Capnographs allow for continuous monitoring of the patients CO2 levels. ETCO2 is reflective of the patients PaCO2 usually within a 5mmHg gradient, this gradient can be affected by pulmonary perfusion.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Transfusion support for the bleeding patient (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Transfusion of blood products is an important lifesaving measure performed frequently in veterinary medicine. The decision to transfuse should not be taken lightly: it is costly and can frequently be clouded by complications. Blood transfusion therapy should be limited to the treatment of anemia, hypoproteinemia, coagulation disorders, or hemodynamic instability.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Anesthesia for the cardiac patient (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Anesthetizing a patient with cardiac disease requires a plan for the use of supportive measures to maintain adequate tissue perfusion. As in the case of left sided cardiac dysfunction patients, volume administration frequently is not an option to support blood pressure. In these cases, should a positive inotropic or pressor agent be indicated, the volume of the adjunctive agent required should be deducted from the volume of crystalloid administered to maintain a balanced hourly rate.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Pain recognition and management (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

What is pain? Pain is defined as an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage. All potential and actual tissue damage in animals should be considered to cause pain. Pain can be experienced with or without accompanying signs of stress (e.g., tachycardia, hypertension). The first step in treating pain is to recognize the signs and symptoms.

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