Tips to help the veterinary team offer good service for pet owners - Firstline
  • SEARCH:
Team Center
Firstline Featuring Information from:

ADVERTISEMENT

Client Service
Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Respiratory/ventilatory monitoring (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Capnographs are used to measure ETCO2. Most capnographs use infrared light absorption to measure CO2 levels. Capnographs allow for continuous monitoring of the patients CO2 levels. ETCO2 is reflective of the patients PaCO2 usually within a 5mmHg gradient, this gradient can be affected by pulmonary perfusion.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

CPCR: Improving resuscitation statistics (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Anesthetic arrests and patients with reversible conditions should be resuscitated aggressively. Reasons for such a poor success rate include severity of underlying disease, delay in the recognition of CPA, and delay in delivery of appropriate therapy.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Nosocomial infections (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Nosocomial infections are defined as infections that are neither present nor incubating at the time of hospital admission. Nosocomial infections range from mild to severe, depending on the affected system and resistance of the bacteria. On average, human nosocomial infections result in a 2.5 times longer length of stay in hospital.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

What every technician should know about parvovirus (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Canine Parvovirus (CPV) is a family of viruses that cause vomiting, hemorrhagic diarrhea, and leukopenia. The virus can infect dogs of any age but, because of effective client education and early, aggressive vaccination protocols, is commonly noted in dogs less than 1 year of age.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Block that pain! (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Pain management is more than the latest popular terminology. It is an important part of veterinary dentistry. Many of the procedures performed on animals are painful and it is our duty as technicians to ensure that our patients are as comfortable as possible. The deliver of local nerve blocks prior to performing many dental procedures or oral surgery is a great way to create preemptive analgesia. This can often be incorporated into a multimodal plan for pain control.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

How self awareness aids our patients: part 2 (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Animals serve many roles when it comes to energy and the planet. Their energy fields are far more expansive than ours – a dog's energy field is approximately ten times that of a human's. A horse's field will encompass a large arena, and a cat's will fill an entire property. The energy of wildlife is especially important to the survival of the planet. They create a frequency that maintains the vibrational health of the planet, and all creatures on it.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

How self awareness aids our patients: part 1 (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Energy to most of us is something that turns lights on and off and runs our cars. We don't realize we are made of energy, and that we interact with other humans and animals on an instinctive, energetic basis. Having an awareness of how we affect others allows us to be better colleagues, practitioners and care givers.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Pain recognition and management (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

What is pain? Pain is defined as an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage. All potential and actual tissue damage in animals should be considered to cause pain. Pain can be experienced with or without accompanying signs of stress (e.g., tachycardia, hypertension). The first step in treating pain is to recognize the signs and symptoms.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Triaging the hit-by-car patient (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

The role of the veterinary technician in traumatic emergencies is pivotal to the survival of the incoming patient. The physical exam must be quick, thorough, and concise. Utilization of all technical skills from careful visualization, palpation, and auscultation is of the utmost importance.

ADVERTISEMENT

Click here