Tips to help the veterinary team offer good service for pet owners - Firstline
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Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Block that pain! (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Pain management is more than the latest popular terminology. It is an important part of veterinary dentistry. Many of the procedures performed on animals are painful and it is our duty as technicians to ensure that our patients are as comfortable as possible. The deliver of local nerve blocks prior to performing many dental procedures or oral surgery is a great way to create preemptive analgesia. This can often be incorporated into a multimodal plan for pain control.

Source: FIRSTLINE

Q&A: Talk clients through tough times to promote third-party payment plans

November 1, 2010

Q&A: Talk clients through tough times to promote third-party payment plans

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Transfusion support for the bleeding patient (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Transfusion of blood products is an important lifesaving measure performed frequently in veterinary medicine. The decision to transfuse should not be taken lightly: it is costly and can frequently be clouded by complications. Blood transfusion therapy should be limited to the treatment of anemia, hypoproteinemia, coagulation disorders, or hemodynamic instability.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Pre-emptive pain management utilizing local and regional nerve blocks (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

What is pain? Pain is defined as an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage. All potential and actual tissue damage in animals should be considered to cause pain. Pain can be experienced with or without accompanying signs of stress (e.g., tachycardia, hypertension). The first step in treating pain is to recognize the signs and symptoms.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Specialty feedings tubes for nutritional support in critically ill patients (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

The primary goal of nutritional assessment is to identify which patient is at risk for malnutrition. As altered nutritional status is associated with adverse clinical outcomes, it becomes paramount to address the nutritional needs early in the critically ill patient.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Anesthesia for the emergency patient (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

As with any trauma patient presented to triage, a thorough pre-operative assessment must be performed and patient assessment begins with the first step inside the door. The traumatized patient will have altered physiological responses that will in turn alter the pharmacokinetics of the agents commonly used to provide anesthesia.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Constant rate infusions: Indications, calculations and applications in pain management (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Systemic administration of analgesic agents is the most common route of delivery during the perioperative period. These routes would include delivery by transdermal, subcutaneous, intramuscular, intra-articular and intravenous. Intravenous administration of analgesic agents may be timed to be given intermittently or by constant rate infusion.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

A treatment plan for the periodontal patient (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Performing a complete dental prophylaxis entails much more than removing plaque and calculus from the teeth. A thorough dental prophylaxis consists of educating the client, an oral examination, charting disease process, pathology and anomalies, radiographs, both supra and sub-gingival plaque and calculus removal, hand scaling, polishing, irrigation and home care instructions.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Triaging the hit-by-car patient (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

The role of the veterinary technician in traumatic emergencies is pivotal to the survival of the incoming patient. The physical exam must be quick, thorough, and concise. Utilization of all technical skills from careful visualization, palpation, and auscultation is of the utmost importance.

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