Career advice for the veterinary team - Firstline
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Professional Development
Source: FIRSTLINE

When work gets personal

June 1, 2008

Q. How do I set boundaries for employees' conversations while at work?

Source: FIRSTLINE

How much do you do?

June 1, 2008

You're more than your title. And a job description may be the tool you need to clarify your manager's expectations and position yourself for growth in your practice, from raises to promotions.

Source: FIRSTLINE

Receptionist position description

June 1, 2008

The receptionist's main responsibility is to assure the smooth, orderly flow of clients and patients. Receptionists report to the Client-Services Director.

Source: FIRSTLINE

Trainees: Open up to learning

June 1, 2008

Show your new team members you're working to make their jobs easier and provide the best service and care.

Source: FIRSTLINE

Employee questionnaire

June 1, 2008

Use this questionnaire to help employees assess their roles and performance in your practice.

Source: PARTNERS IN PRACTICE

Six steps to manage stress (Sponsored by Intervet/Schering-Plough Animal Health)

June 1, 2008

The day-to-day tasks and surprises of an equine practitioner can be stressful to even the most level-headed person.

Source: FIRSTLINE

8 tips to get heard

June 1, 2008

You educate clients, recommend care, train new team members, propose ideas, relay CE experiences, lead meetings ... Whew! You talk a lot. So use these tips to make sure you're heard.

Source: FIRSTLINE

The topics you tailor

June 1, 2008

Ninety-six percent of team members say they tailor their client education message based on the pet or client. Here's a breakdown of the criteria they use to customize their education message to pet owners.

Source: FIRSTLINE

Help light team members' fire

June 1, 2008

Q. How do I inspire an uninspired team member?

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