Continuing education for the veterinary team - Firstline
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Continuing Education
Source: CVC IN BALTIMORE PROCEEDINGS

Feline blood pressure measurement: You can do it! (Proceedings)

April 1, 2010

Case studies will be utilized to highlight major points in this presentation.

Source: CVC IN BALTIMORE PROCEEDINGS

From the beginning-Oral anatomy and physiology (Proceedings)

April 1, 2010

The implementation of veterinary dentistry is increasing in both private and specialty practices. More responsibility is being delegated to the technician, and the expansion of this service relies heavily on a well trained and informed staff. We must remember it is the veterinarian's role to make a diagnosis and prescribe treatment, but it is the technician's role to carry out these orders with competence.

Source: CVC IN BALTIMORE PROCEEDINGS

Analgesic drugs and sedatives (Proceedings)

April 1, 2010

Pain management in veterinary medicine was practically unheard of twenty years ago, and it has advanced dramatically over the past decade. Not only is the physiology of pain and its effects becoming better understood, pain management is considered a vital part of most treatment plans.

Source: CVC IN BALTIMORE PROCEEDINGS

Getting ready for the eye patient (Proceedings)

April 1, 2010

Anatomic and physiologic considerations are the basis for proper diagnostic techniques. We will discuss basic diagnostic procedures and relative pharmacological consideration to enhance the ophthalmic examination.

Source: CVC IN BALTIMORE PROCEEDINGS

Respiratory disease and emergencies (Proceedings)

April 1, 2010

The pulmonary system is complex with various anatomical structures performing highly specialized functions. When evaluating the system it is useful to examine each structure for its unique function and associated potential complications. Physical assessment and monitoring tools such as pulse oximetry and arterial blood gas analysis are used to localize respiratory problems and guide treatment which may include supplemental oxygen therapy, appropriate drugs or pulmonary physiotherapy.

Source: CVC IN BALTIMORE PROCEEDINGS

Chemotherapy safety: Why, when, and how (Proceedings)

April 1, 2010

Chemotherapy safety can be broken down into two big categories: safety for the patient, and safety for the individuals handling the drugs. Understanding how chemotherapy works provides a background for knowing potential dangers of treatments as well as how to safely use these beneficial drugs.

Source: CVC IN BALTIMORE PROCEEDINGS

Continuous rate infusions in intraoperative pain management (Proceedings)

April 1, 2010

CRI stands for continuous rate infusion, and its use is becoming more prevalent in the veterinary field as a method to control intraoperative and postoperative pain. It was not long ago that the best options for surgical pain management were intramuscular or bolus injections of opioids, which remain acceptable options, but CRIs can be a better option for patients undergoing prolonged, invasive or painful procedures.

Source: CVC IN BALTIMORE PROCEEDINGS

Anesthesia monitoring (Proceedings)

April 1, 2010

The overall goal of anesthesia is survival and optimum recovery from surgery. In order to accomplish this goal, the surgery patient must be continually monitored for changes, especially deterioration in respiration, cardiac function and tissue perfusion regardless of the specific surgery.

Source: CVC IN BALTIMORE PROCEEDINGS

Probioticcs and GI health (Proceedings)

April 1, 2010

The gastrointestinal microbiota, that is the collection of all microorganisms found in the gastrointestinal tract, has long been recognized to play a crucial role in gastrointestinal health.

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