FIRSTLINE, Jan 1, 2008 - Firstline
  • SEARCH:
FirstLine

ADVERTISEMENT

FIRSTLINE, Jan 1, 2008
Cover story
How to serve clients with disabilities
By Toni Eames, MS , Ed Eames, PhD
Use these tips to tune in to the needs of your clients with disabilities—and help them offer top-notch care for their animal companions.
More than words
By Kristine Suszczynski
An angry client taught me to probe deeper to uncover the real reason behind his seemingly unreasonable behavior.
Team Building
7 tips to transform bad behavior
By Kelly Stazyk
Use these targeted tactics to chisel away at team members' bad behavior and heigh-ho poor performance right out of your practice.
Front Desk
Tell your story
By Portia Stewart
Most of us aren't very comfortable talking about ourselves. It's a hard skill to master, and too often it feels like you're bragging. But if you're not talking about what you do well, how will others know? If you're waiting for them to catch you in the act, you may have a long wait.
Ask the Experts
Turn up the dial on client education
By Pamela Stevenson, CVPM
Q When I discuss client education topics, I feel like clients are tuning me out. How can I make them listen?
Handle with care
By Robin Downing, DVM, Dipl. AAPM
Q What can we do to gently handle pets with possible pain issues?
Ask Amy: Get prescriptions out the door
Our receptionists often forget to give clients their pets' medications before they leave our practice. I created a hanging prescription filing system to simplify the process, but that hasn't resolved the problem. I've approached my managers about the issue, but they don't seem concerned. What should I do?
Ask Amy: Our team is lactose intolerant
We rehired a team member after she had a baby and she's implemented a nursing regimen at work. At lunch, she nurses in her car with her undergarments visible or on the side lawn of the practice parking lot. Then she pumps—in our doctor's office. The rest of the staff is uncomfortable, and we would like to encourage discretion while still supporting her decision to nurse her child. How do I approach this employee?
Prepare clients for potential charges
By Adam Dixon
Q How can we prepare clients for unexpected costs that result from problems found during dental cleanings?
Pearls of Practice
Reward the team with a sneak attack
By Debbie Kaczmarski, LVT
The team at Concord Veterinary Center in Springville, NY, expected an uneventful monthly practice staff meeting, but Debbie Kaczmarski, LVT, the hospital manager, and Craig Wiede, DVM, the practice's owner, had another plan.
Chip away resistance
By Paige Phillips, RVT
For clients who believe their pet won't get lost or feel a collar and tag sufficiently identify their pet, Paige Phillips, RVT, a Firstline Editorial Advisory Board member, suggests sharing these examples of how a microchip can save the day—and their pet's life:
End front vs. back battles
By Crystal Steen
Sick of the communication gaps and the infighting about policy changes that often occur between front and back office team members? Crystal Steen, a receptionist at Pet Care Vet in Virginia Beach, Va., suggests electing area liaisons.
Sample script: Explain the risks of zoonosis
You can safeguard the lives of pets and their families by discussing zoonotic diseases and prevention.
Who's tuning in to private discussions?
By Caitlin Rivers
Mrs. Busibodi's eyes say she's examining your tastefully displayed practice brochure, but her dog-like hearing is tuned to eavesdrop so she can catch all the juicy details about Mr. Neverpay's past-due account.
"On the job" Bobbi Ray, RVT
By Bobbi Ray, RVT
On an ordinary day a few months ago, I watched a cartoon with my toddler about seeds of discontent.
Making It Meaningful
Diagnosis: blocked!
By Joanne Bowman, RVT
My own illness gave me a glimpse into the tough road to recovery the patients at our clinic face every day—and how my care can make a difference.
Efficiency Rules
Quit waiting around for no-shows
By Elizabeth Trotta
You'd much rather be working with clients and pets than thumb-twiddling or standing around dreaming about services you could be rendering. So use these tips to cut back on no-shows and get back to business.
Communication Strategies
How will you tell her?
By Jim Kramer, DVM, CVPM
It's never easy to be the bearer of bad tidings. But you can ease the hurt clients feel with a sensitive approach. Here's what you need to know to break bad news gently.
Web Exclusive
All about microchipping
Use this client education form to answer clients' questions about microchips.
Reasons to smile list
Use this form to create your own list of reasons to smile. Then share your top answers with us.
By the Numbers
27 reasons to smile
Economy got you down? Read this list to remind yourself why you love your job.

ADVERTISEMENT

Click here