FIRSTLINE, Oct 1, 2005 - Firstline
  • SEARCH:
FirstLine

ADVERTISEMENT

FIRSTLINE, Oct 1, 2005
Team Building
When the doctor doesn't see the problem
By John Lofflin
Favoritism, morale problems, unbearable associates–sometimes the doctor just doesn't see the issue. Use these strategies to clean off the doctor's rose-colored glasses, without making him or her mad.
Professional Development
Sample evaluation form
An evaluation form helps you pinpoint a team member's strengths and weaknesses so you can agree on a plan for professional development.
Move your job in the right direction
By Sheila Grosdidier, BS, RVT
Frustrated with your work? Use this advice to choose the right path and take control of your career.
10 key steps that position you for a promotion
Are you ready for a career move? Here's what to think about.
Sample compensation statement
A compensation statement outlines all the benefits of working for the practice.
Cover story
5 ways to make clients feel welcome
By Nora O'Donnell
It only takes a little extra effort to make pet owners feel special. The benefit: happy, loyal clients who appreciate your care.
Communication Strategies
Tips to tackle difficult discussions
By Portia Stewart
It's hard to find the right words when you're broaching a topic that could spark tempers. Here's help to head off eruptions with co-workers, clients, or the boss.
Making It Meaningful
The most rewarding job
By Stacie Knapp, CVT
One technician found volunteer work was a perfect solution to renew her love for the profession.
Money Matters
Don't let charges escape (and why you should care)
By Karen E. Felsted, CPA, MS, DVM, CVPM
If missed charges are slipping out the door, you may be seeing a smaller paycheck and fewer benefits—and you may find it harder to offer high-quality care.
Sample audit summary form
Use this form to record your findings when you review medical records for missed charges.
Efficiency Rules
Don't let scheduling troubles weigh you down
By Heather Kirkwood
Use these timesaving tips to stay on schedule and keep your entire team afloat when disruptions threaten to throw your day dangerously off course.
Front Desk
Work for a stubborn cuss?
By Marnette Denell Falley
I've met a lot of great doctors. And I like them. As a group, I think veterinarians are among the nicest people on the planet. And, just like you, they have a special calling to help pets that sets them apart from other professionals. But that doesn't mean every doctor is a joy to work for or with. And I know they're not always that open to doing things differently.
Ask the Experts
I'm always behind
By Christiane Holbrook
There aren't enough hours in the day to finish all of my duties. What should I do?
Clean it up!
By Julie Legred, CVT
I'm the first person in the office every morning, and the evening staff always leaves messes for me to clean up. How can I encourage them to pull their weight?
Feeling underappreciated
By Pamela Stevenson, CVPM
The doctor doesn't recognize or appreciate me. How can I let her know everything I do?
Picking up the slack
By Jessica Janowski
My co-workers don't take responsibility for their duties, and I often end up picking up the slack. What can I do?
Help! We need more help
By Dr. Mary Ann Vande Linde
How do I convince the doctor that we're understaffed?
We need a meeting
By Jane Larson
We never have staff meetings, and no one ever knows what's going on in the practice. How can we encourage staff meetings?
Pearls of Practice
Get personal with clients
By Gary Morgan
Gary Morgan, a receptionist for Robert E. Lewis, a dentist in Overland Park, Kan., has a special talent: He remembers the name of most of the clients who walk through the door. And with more than 1,500 client records in the practice database, that's no small feat.
Client education: a team project
In 23 percent of practices, credentialed technicians are responsible for most of the client's education, according to a recent survey by VetMedTeam.com. In 52 percent of practices, veterinarians handle the bulk of education, while in 19 percent of practices, veterinary assistants take charge of this task. Here's a look at the percentage of respondents who say team members discuss these issues with clients:
Paging Dr. X
By Shelly Hiemer, CVT
Dr. X is running behind–again. But you don't want to interrupt him in front of the client. Here's an easy solution: Get him a pager. Shelly Hiemer, CVT, a technician at AMVET in Otsego, Minn., says her doctor chose to carry one so staff members could notify him when problems arise without interrupting. Then they developed a message system to indicate the degree of emergency. For example, if the team pages the doctor with number 33, he has 10 minutes to wrap up and get to the next client. Number 66 means he only has five minutes, and 99 means it's an emergency.
Hook price shoppers
By Sally Hickey
Don't let that next phone call be the client who got away. Use these tips from Sally Hickey, a receptionist at Short Pump Animal Hospital in Richmond, Va.
Streamline surgery releases
By Carrie Gaffney
End-of-the-day surgery releases can bring chaos and confusion to even the most organized veterinary teams. That's why team members at Rock Road Animal Hospital in St. Louis, Mo., developed a system to route clients through the checkout process before they're reunited with their pets.
On the job: Sheila Lewis, CVT
By Sheila Lewis, CVT
Getting to know Sheila Lewis, CVT
Celebrate a special technician
Drs. Mark Shackelford and Lou Ann Wolfe have a few things in common: They both work at practices on the same street in Tulsa, Okla., and they both have a team member who shines. For Dr. Shackelford, that person is Kimberly Seigrist, RVT.

ADVERTISEMENT

Click here