Gastroenterology | Veterinary Medicine

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Gastroenterology

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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Nov 01, 2012
Veterinary strategies on fighting this all-too-common and life-threatening condition in horses.
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CUSTOM VETERINARY MEDIA: Aug 20, 2012
With a vomiting dog, it is critical to distinguish between pancreatitis and nonspecific gastroenteritis. This is because the standard-of-care treatment of pancreatitis is no longer identical to treatment of nonspecific gastroenteritis. Accurate diagnosis will guide you to the best treatment plan for your patient.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Dec 01, 2011
This study evaluated whether treating dogs with amoxicillin/clavulanic acid affects the clinical course or outcome.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Oct 30, 2011
By dvm360.com staff
Is vomiting hairballs normal? Yes, but far less normal than we previously thought, says feline expert Dr. Gary D. Norsworthy during a special Power Hour presentation at CVC in San Diego.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Oct 18, 2011
Can you determine why Tupper can't handle his supper?
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CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS: Oct 01, 2011
Idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by chronic gastrointestinal signs associated with diffuse accumulation of lymphocytes and plasma cells in the lamina propria and morphologic abnormalities of the intestinal mucosa and epithelium.
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CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS: Oct 01, 2011
Clinical signs suggestive of esophageal disease include regurgitation, dysphagia, odynophagia, salivation, retching, gagging, and repeated swallowing. Other less specific signs can include weight loss, anorexia or ravenous appetite, and depression.
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CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS: Oct 01, 2011
Esophagitis is characterized by acute or chronic inflammation of the esophagus resulting from mechanical, corrosive, or acid-peptic injury to the mucosa. Mild esophagitis may be self-limiting or resolve with medical treatment.
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CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS: Oct 01, 2011
Chronic hepatitis associated with abnormal accumulation of copper in liver cells is emerging as an important form of chronic liver disease in dogs.
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CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS: Oct 01, 2011
Giardia duodenalis (also known as G. intestinalis, G. lamblia) is a pear-shaped, binucleated, flagellated protozoan parasite that infects the small intestine, impairs mucosal absorption, and causes diarrhea.
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CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS: Oct 01, 2011
Molecular studies have determined that the intestines of dogs and cats harbor a complex population of commensal bacteria, referred to as the microbiota. Depending on its composition, the microbiota can be beneficial or harmful to the host.
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CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS: Aug 01, 2011
Small animal veterinarians prevent, diagnose, and treat parasitic infections every day, and most veterinarians are very comfortable managing these infections in their patients. However, when it comes to the zoonotic potential of parasitic organisms, it is challenging to keep up with new research, client questions can become tougher, and there becomes a fine line between educating a client about realistic risk and inducing unnecessary fear.
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CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS: Aug 01, 2011
When a new pet is acquired, numerous factors become part of the owner's decision of which diet to select. A pet owner may consider feeding advice from family, friends, the pet's breeder, trainer, or their local veterinarian. The internet has also become a large available source of information for pet owners regarding feeding options and other health issues for pets.
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CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS: Aug 01, 2011
The gallbladder is a thin-walled, muscular tear-dropped shaped sac that lies on the visceral surface of the liver, between the quadrate lobe and the right medial lobe. The gallbladder consists of a fundus, body, and neck, which opens into the cystic duct. The cystic duct then empties into the common bile duct which travels to the duodenum, ending in the major duodenal papilla.
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CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS: Aug 01, 2011
Liver disease is common in both dogs and cats, but acute liver disease is far less common than chronic hepatic disease in either species. Also, it should be noted that many patients with an acute onset of clinical signs suggestive of liver disease actually do have chronic liver disease.