Internal medicine | Veterinary Medicine

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Internal medicine

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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Mar 01, 2006
Dogs and cats with pancreatitis commonly display nonspecific clinical signs, so the condition can be difficult to diagnose. But there also has been a lack of diagnostic tests for pancreatitis that are both sensitive and specific. In this article, I provide an overview of the available diagnostic tests, including a new serum test.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Mar 01, 2006
A 10-year-old 8.6-lb (3.9-kg) spayed female domestic medium-haired cat had been evaluated by the referring veterinarian because of lethargy, right pelvic limb lameness, lumbar discomfort, reluctance to jump, and tail weakness.
Mar 01, 2006
Gastrointestinal parasites are insidious causes of disease in cats. Protozoan parasitic infections in particular can be difficult to detect because there are often no signs of disease, or the signs, such as diarrhea, are nonspecific. But these infections must be uncovered and cured before they cause serious disease or spread to housemates or even owners.
Mar 01, 2006
The most common question asked of the Companion Animal Parasite Council by practicing veterinarians is "Do these guidelines apply to me?" Our answer is always an unequivocal "Yes."
Mar 01, 2006
In patients with clinical signs of one tick-borne disease, it is important to consider that they may be infected with multiple tick-borne pathogens. Coinfections may account for the diverse clinical signs some patients exhibit.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Feb 01, 2006
I frequently notice a disparity between referred patients' in-house urinalysis results and laboratory-read urinalysis results.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Feb 01, 2006
When addressing arthritis in cats, we presume similarities to arthritis in dogs, interpreting radiographs and clinical signs with canine differential diagnoses in mind. And we develop therapies based on how dogs are managed. But these presumptions have little scientific basis. In fact, we know little about how many cats have arthritis, what effect their arthritis has on their lifestyles, or to what degree therapy improves their comfort level.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Feb 01, 2006
How often have you heard clients say "My cat`s just getting old and cranky--he bites when we try to pick him up," or "She`s missing the box because she`s old. We think it`s time to let her go"
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Feb 01, 2006
A 3-year-old castrated male German shepherd was referred to the Foster Hospital for Small Animals at Tufts University for evaluation of polyuria, polydipsia, and decreasing appetite.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Feb 01, 2006
Cats are living longer because of a greater focus on routine healthcare for pets. As their veterinarians, we are challenged with the task of helping these cats live long, high-quality lives. The American Association of Feline Practitioners and the Academy of Feline Medicine (AAFP/AFM) Panel Report on Feline Senior Care1 provides a consensus on important goals and recommendations to help you care for senior cats. This article highlights many of the principal points in that report in conjunction with my clinical experience.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Feb 01, 2006
Assessing albumin production and the possible causes of albumin loss is important when diagnosing and treating patients with hypoalbuminemia.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Feb 01, 2006
In contemporary veterinary medicine, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an important tool in the diagnosis of neurological problems.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Jan 01, 2006
A routine physical examination of a 1.5-year-old spayed female German shepherd that had been presented for vaccinations revealed generalized lymph node adenopathy and a slight fever (102.8 F).
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Jan 01, 2006
We often underuse the auscultation and physical examination techniques our predecessors mastered to successfully evaluate the cardiovascular system. Instead, we lean on echocardiography to offset the subtle nuances we fail to recognize.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Jan 01, 2006
You can easily detect most arrhythmias on physical examination, but you'll need an electrocardiogram to identify an arrhythmia's exact nature.