Oncology | Veterinary Medicine

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Oncology

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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Mar 01, 2005
Comparing the microscopic features of tumor cells with their normal cellular counterparts is the key to diagnosing a neoplastic disease.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Mar 01, 2005
Cancer is a leading cause of death in pet dogs and cats. It is estimated that almost 50 percent of geriatric dogs and 33 percent of cats will die of cancer. As the pet population in the United States continues to age, cancer in pet animals is expected to become an even more significant problem in the field of animal health.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Jan 01, 2005
In this retrospective study from a veterinary teaching hospital, the medical records of 14 dogs with tumors of the retroperitoneal space (excluding those arising from the kidneys, adrenal glands, or ureters) were reviewed.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Nov 01, 2004
Selecting appropriate chemotherapy protocols and successfully treating dogs with lymphoma require complete clinical staging of the disease.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Sep 01, 2004
Localized primary tumors with a minimal risk for metastasis are commonly treated with surgery or radiation. But chemotherapy may occasionally be used to treat these tumors instead of or in addition to standard local therapy.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Sep 01, 2003
Cleveland-The majority of veterinarians say the most competitive business pressure is coming from Internet sales of veterinary products.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Oct 01, 2001
Technological advances and practitioner compliance appear to have lessened the risk of cancer in veterinarians, although potentially carcinogenic exposures are still an unfeigned threat to the profession.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Oct 01, 2001
Use of cytotoxic drugs are believed on the rise, officials report, consequently, so are the potential adverse health risks to veterinarians handling these chemicals.