Physical rehabilitation | Veterinary Medicine

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Physical rehabilitation

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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Feb 01, 2011
Why you should consider adding this highly trained medical professional to your rehabilitation team.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Feb 01, 2011
A Q&A with canine physical rehabilitation expert Darryl Millis, DVM.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Jan 14, 2011
By dvm360.com staff
What exercises are best for dogs that have been recumbent for an extended period?
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Oct 01, 2010
Several effective physical rehabilitation techniques can be used in critically ill patients.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Aug 01, 2010
A variety of treatments can get patients back comfortably on all fours.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Aug 01, 2010
Janet Van Dyke, DVM, talks about the significance of the new ACVAMR specialty designation and trends in animal rehabilitation.
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CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS: Apr 01, 2010
Similar to dogs, joint disorders of the cat are common. Despite this fact, the reported treatment options for cats with joint disease are limited.
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CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS: Apr 01, 2010
In the field of small animal orthopedics, orthoses, prostheses and other assistive devices are an emerging technology that can aid in the well-being of our canine patients. These devices are used to either correct or accommodate the affected limb(s) following trauma or surgical intervention, and may be utilized as temporary or permanent modalities.
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CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS: Apr 01, 2010
There are numerous studies indicating the positive benefits of rehabilitation therapy following CCL surgery. In summary, rehabilitation therapy has been shown to improve muscle mass and attenuate muscle atrophy that occurs in the post-operative period, increase stifle joint ROM, especially extension, improve weight-bearing as measured by force plate analysis, and reduce the progression of osteoarthritis.
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CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS: Apr 01, 2010
The most common hind limb orthopedic/sports medicine conditions afflicting active dogs are iliopsoas strains, cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) insuffiency and gracilis and semitendinosus contracture.
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CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS: Apr 01, 2010
Diagnosing and treating forelimb conditions in dogs can be very challenging. Many dogs present with a similar history including minimal responsive to rest and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and increased lameness following exercise and heavy activity.
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CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS: Apr 01, 2010
Injuries to the carpus and tarsus are common in agility and sporting dogs. The carpal and tarsal joints act as sock absorbers for the limb during weight bearing.
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CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS: Apr 01, 2010
Soft tissue injuries and osteoarthritis are common conditions afflicting active dogs due to the repetitive forces placed on the joints. Microtrauma to the tendons, ligaments, and the articular surfaces of joints can occur, creating an environment for osteoarthritic development.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Feb 01, 2010
Therapeutic exercise can provide a wide range of benefits for veterinary rehabilitation patients.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Dec 09, 2009
By dvm360.com staff
Underwater treadmill therapy keeps patrol dogs in top form.