Penetrating stories on the veterinary issues most affecting veterinary practices - Veterinary Economics
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Industry Issues
Source: VETERINARY ECONOMICS

Make home only a scan away

May 1, 2006

Dr. Cyrena Rose, a relief veterinarian in Miami, Fla., suggests technicians check each chart during first puppy visits and annual exams to see whether a pet is microchipped. "If the pet has a chip, scan it to show clients that it's still working and remind them to keep their contact information updated with the company that manufactured the chip," says Dr. Rose. If clients moved or never registered, this helps them realize the importance of registering, she says. And of course, if the pet doesn't have a chip, this gives the technician an opportunity to explain the benefits of microchipping to the owner.

Source: VETERINARY ECONOMICS

Keep clients from wiping out on the Web

May 1, 2006

Dr. Doug Clarke at Pet Veterinary Clinic in Grandville, Mich., says it used to send chills up his spine when clients said they'd been looking up medical information on the Internet.

Source: VETERINARY ECONOMICS

Specialty medicine doesn't have to lead to a fight over cases

November 1, 2005

In the new millennium, everyone can win by joining forces to fight for patients' best interests.

Source: VETERINARY ECONOMICS

The winds of change

September 1, 2005

For the 30 years I've been a veterinarian, I've heard we don't have too few doctors; we have too many veterinary hospitals," says Dr. Dennis Cloud, owner of Cloud Veterinary Center in St. Louis, Mo., and a Veterinary Economics Editorial Advisory Board member. While dramatic change is never an overnight event, the winds are blowing; Dr. Cloud's sentiments echo those of many in the veterinary profession, spurring the question: What practice models will define the future of the profession?

Source: VETERINARY ECONOMICS

Looking forward to a prosperous year

August 1, 2005

As owners spend oodles on pets, you're seeing more business. And you're managing your practice better than ever before. Is there a downside?

Source: VETERINARY ECONOMICS

How long do clients spend waiting?

August 1, 2005

Data shows that if your clients arrive during a busy time, their average wait for check-in and check-out can hit 21 to 29 minutes during a 42- to 49-minute visit. That's almost half their time at the practice.

Source: VETERINARY ECONOMICS

When helping others hurts you

August 1, 2005

Nearly 30 percent of practitioners are at risk for compassion fatigue. Would you recognize the symptoms and know what to do?

Source: VETERINARY ECONOMICS

Pet spending in America and abroad

August 1, 2005

Fifty-three percent of respondents to the AAHA 2004 Pet Owner Survey say they're spending more today on pet products and services than they did three years ago. However, the overall increase in pet spending is less than in recent years.

Source: VETERINARY ECONOMICS

Tallying up your team members

August 1, 2005

Clearly, more team members work in veterinary practice than doctors. But how many are there exactly?

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