Hiring strong veterinary team members and firing weak ones - Veterinary Economics
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Hiring and firing
Source: VETERINARY ECONOMICS

Saying goodbye: Terminating a long-time veterinary employee

June 1, 2011

It's never easy to let go of someone who's been by your side from the beginning at your veterinary practice. But sometimes it's the only option left. Here's how to do it with grace.

Source: VETERINARY ECONOMICS

5 steps to letting go of a veterinary team member

June 1, 2011

You might not want to let go of that receptionist or veterinary technician, but sometimes you're left with no choice.

Source: CVC IN WASHINGTON, D.C. PROCEEDINGS

Management would be easy–if it weren't for my people! (Proceedings)

May 1, 2011

Take recruitment and induction seriously if you want a top performing practice.

Source: VETERINARY ECONOMICS

Pre-employment screening protects your practice and your clients

March 1, 2011

Don't put your veterinary practice at risk. Find out about job applicants before they turn into team members.

Source: DVM360 MAGAZINE

When non-compete contracts get out of hand

February 1, 2011

There is a time and place for non-compete contracting in the veterinary practice.

Source: VETERINARY ECONOMICS

Creative employees are often left behind

January 17, 2011

Hiring practices don't match what managers say is a desired trait.

Source: FIRSTLINE

Managers: Give overqualified veterinary applicants a second look

January 11, 2011

Study shows superstar candidates are better—longer—fits for veterinary practices.

Source: VETERINARY ECONOMICS

5 steps to a great hire at your practice

November 10, 2010

Pay attention to first impressions. Provide working interviews. Thoroughly screen your new veterinary practice hires. These best practices can decrease employee turnover.

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Veterinary employment contracts should be a win-win agreement (Proceedings)

November 1, 2010

Employment contracts exist even if they are not in writing. The problem with oral contracts is in trying to enforce them. Contracts require a meeting of the minds of two persons followed by some form of payment for enforceability. Employees, although commonly intimidated, must realize they are on equal footing with the employer.

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