Veterinary personnel solutions that work when things go wrong - Veterinary Economics
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Discipline
Source: DVM360 MAGAZINE

Communicate first, discipline second

November 1, 2007

As various associations adopt guidelines or standards of care for the practice of veterinary medicine, a concern exists that they will be interpreted as current standards of practice by state regulatory boards and the attorneys general who represent them before they have been accepted by the masses.

Source: VETERINARY ECONOMICS

Don't get tangled in the Web

January 1, 2007

Avoid sticky liability issues, and make sure your team knows what you expect when they navigate the 'Net.

Source: VETERINARY ECONOMICS

Employee warning notice

October 1, 2006

Use this form to document verbal warnings when you're disciplining employees.

Source: VETERINARY ECONOMICS

Avoiding an age-discrimination suit

June 1, 2006

A longtime staff member who's in her late 50s is having trouble learning our new computerized billing system. We don't want to fire her, but we need to replace her with someone who can handle our new technology. If we asked her to retire, would we risk an age-discrimination suit?

Source: VETERINARY ECONOMICS

Warning: fire ahead

March 1, 2006

How many warnings should I give, and when should I fire someone?

Source: VETERINARY ECONOMICS

Controlling unauthorized overtime

January 1, 2006

I have an employee who regularly stays for overtime that I haven't authorized. My attorney says I have to pay her for the time, even though I didn't schedule it. What can I do to keep team members from working unapproved overtime?

Source: VETERINARY ECONOMICS

Take action with a warning notice

January 1, 2006

Take these steps to document poor performance.

Source: VETERINARY ECONOMICS

Stop complaining about negative team members, and show them the door!

March 1, 2005

Let's solve your morale problem by just firing all the unhappy people. Think that sounds rash? The truth is you have nothing to gain from keeping them around. You can't change them. Yes, you can require certain behaviors, such as being on time, doing their jobs, or developing proficient skills or knowledge. But a lot of people simply have a rotten, negative attitude, and there isn't much you or anyone else can do to change that.

Source: DVM Training Room

Create a plan for employee discipline

July 1, 2004

Several years ago I attended a seminar entitled "Employee Discipline and Performance Mistakes." Afterwards, I wrote up a simple, step-by-step plan for dealing with common employee discipline problems, like tardiness, not following the dress code or standards of conduct, failing to compete tasks or checklists.

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